Exploring the New Frontiers of Security Privatisation: Web-Based Social Networking Services and Their Challenging Contribution to Foster Security and Public Safety

Chapter

Abstract

Social media platforms and services have become nowadays both the object and the instruments of security-oriented initiatives. Their capabilities are exploited by law enforcement, security, and public safety agencies for managing crisis and emergencies, for policing, and/or conducting intelligence activities in the field of counter-terrorism, crime and other threat prevention and response. This chapter reviews these initiatives and, from a broad perspective, addresses some of the relevant governance implications they raise. Starting from a short presentation of the position of social media platforms, technologies, and services in the EU and the Italian security discourse, the chapter examines the potential use of these tools for policing, intelligence, and crisis management. Then, it reviews the EU (supranational) and Italian (domestic) policy frameworks governing the employment of social media for security. Special attention is paid to the study of the role, responsibilities and functions that are assigned to providers. The chapter concludes by acknowledging that improvements to the governance of the security-related employment of social media can be achieved through the adoption and implementation of a more coordinated, coherent, comprehensive, and effectively inclusive approach to the matter.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ETH Center for Security StudyZurichSwitzerland

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