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Conclusion: Educating for Social Justice—Learning from Service-Learning Alumni

  • Tania D. Mitchell
Chapter

Abstract

Using interviews from alumni of the Citizen Scholars Program, in this chapter, the author explores the participants’ definitions of social justice and the ways they enact their commitments to a more just world in order to understand how service-learning experiences can serve to support students at research universities toward taking action for a more just and equitable world.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tania D. Mitchell
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Education and Human DevelopmentUniversity of Minnesota Twin CitiesMinneapolisUSA

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