Advertisement

Debunking Interregionalism: Concepts, Types and Critique – With a Pan-Atlantic Focus

  • Gian Luca GardiniEmail author
  • Andrés Malamud
Chapter
Part of the United Nations University Series on Regionalism book series (UNSR, volume 15)

Abstract

Interregionalism means region-to-region relations. Its relevance lies on two assumptions: that regionalism is a significant mechanism of governance and that regions are outward looking. The fact that both assumptions are contested confers the concept of interregionalism a structural fuzziness. In this chapter we seek to grasp the phenomenon by following a sequential path: we first deal with definitions, types and theory, only then to look into the empirical evidence in search of correspondence between names and facts. By looking into transatlantic interregionalism, we find it as a large umbrella that brings together very diverse groupings of countries under a same, moderately inconsequential, working mechanism: summitry.

Keywords

Atlantic Interregionalism Regional organisations Regionalism Regions 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to Benjamin Faude, Andréas Litsegård, Frank Mattheis and Fredrik Söderbaum for very generous advice.

References

  1. Aggarwal, V., & Fogarty, E. A. (2005). The limits of interregionalism: The EU and North America. Journal of European Integration, 27(3), 327–346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. América Latina Hoy. (2005). Issue #40 on “Presidential Summits”. University of Salamanca.Google Scholar
  3. Baert, F., Scaramagli, T., & Söderbaum, F. (Eds.). (2014). Intersecting interregionalism. Regions, global governance and the EU. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  4. Börzel, T. A., & Risse, T. (2009). Diffusing (Inter-) Regionalism: The EU as a Model of Regional Integration. KFG working paper Series, No. 7, Kolleg-Forschergruppe (KFG) “The Transformative Power of Europe”. Free University Berlin.Google Scholar
  5. Caetano, G. (2010). Introducción. In G. Caetano (Ed.), Las Negociaciones entre América Latina y el Caribe con la Unión Europea. Ediciones Trilce: Montevideo.Google Scholar
  6. Claude, I. L. (1971). Swords into plowshares. The problems and progress of international organization. New York: Random House.Google Scholar
  7. Cooper, A. F. (2010). The G20 as an improvised crisis committee and/or a contested ‘steering committee’. International Affairs, 86(3), 741–757.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. de Medeiros, M. A. (2000). La Genèse du Mercosud. Dynamisme Interne, Influence de l’Union Européenne et Insertion Internationale. Paris: L’Harmattan.Google Scholar
  9. Doidge, M. (2011). The European Union and interregionalism. Patterns of engagement. Ashgate.Google Scholar
  10. Doidge, M. (2014). Interregionalism and the European Union: Conceptualising group-to-group relations. In F. Baert, T. Scaramagli, & F. Söderbaum (Eds.), Intersecting interregionalism. Regions, global governance and the EU. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  11. Ecorys. (2006). Evaluation of the civil society dialogue at DG trade. Assessment of relevance, effectiveness and efficiency of CSD policy and procedures. Report commissioned by the EU Dg Trade. Rotterdam 9th October.Google Scholar
  12. Eyinla, B. M. (2004). Beyond Cairo: Emerging pattern of Euro-African relationship. Africa: Rivista trimestrale di studi e documentazione dell’Istituto italiano per l’Africa e l’Oriente, 59(2), 159–178.Google Scholar
  13. Fabbrini, S., & Malamud, A. (2013). Le organizzazioni regionali e l’integrazione economica. In R. Belloni, M. Moschella, & D. Sicurelli (Eds.), Le organizzazioni internazionali: struttura, funzioni, impatto (pp. 167–186). Il Mulino: Bologna.Google Scholar
  14. Fawcett, L., & Hurrell, A. (Eds.). (1995). Regionalism in world politics: Regional organization and international order. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  15. FCO 1, Foreign and Commonwealth Office. (2013). Interview with a Diplomat member of the UK delegation to the 2013 EU-Latin America and the Caribbean Summit. London, 28th February.Google Scholar
  16. FCO 2, Foreign and Commonwealth Office. (2012). Interview with a Diplomat who supported the UK Government Delegation to the 2013 EU-Latin America and the Caribbean Summit. Santiago de Chile, 14th September.Google Scholar
  17. Gahr Store, J. (2012). Trops de sommets tue les sommets. Le Monde Diplomatique. September, 11.Google Scholar
  18. Gamble, A., & Payne, A. (1996). Regionalism and world order. London: Macmillan Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Goldstein, J., & Keohane, R. O. (1993). Ideas and Foreign Policy: An Analytical Framework. In J. Goldstein & R. O. Keohane (Eds.), Ideas and foreign policy. Beliefs, institutions, and political change (pp. 3–30). Ithaca/London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Hänggi, H. (2000). Interregionalism: Empirical and theoretical perspectives. Paper prepared for the Workshop “Dollars, Democracy and Trade. External Influence on Economic Integration in the Americas”. Los Angeles, May 18.Google Scholar
  21. Hänggi, H., Rüland, J., & Roloff, R. (Eds.). (2006). Interregionalism and international relations. London/New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  22. Hettne, B., & Söderbaum, F. (1998). The new regionalism Approach. Politeia, 17(3), 6–21.Google Scholar
  23. Hettne, B., & Söderbaum, F. (2000). Theorizing the rise of ‘Regionness’. New Political Economy, 5(3), 457–473.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Higgott, R., & Phillips, N. (2000). Challenging triumphalism and convergence: The limits of global liberalization in Asia and Latin America. Review of International Studies, 26(3), 359–379.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Hill, C., & Smith, M. (2011). International relations and the European Union. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  26. Hulse, M., Stapel, S. & Striebinger, K. (2015). Conceptualizing and theorizing the drivers, interactions, and effects of overlapping regionalism. Paper prepared for the workshop overlapping regionalism: Drivers, interactions, effects, ISA Annual Convention. New Orleans, 17 February.Google Scholar
  27. Hurrell, A. (1995). Regionalism in theoretical perspective. In L. Fawcett & A. Hurrell (Eds.), Regionalism in world politics. Regional organization and international order. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  28. Isbell, P., & Nolan García, K. A. (2015). Regionalism and interregionalism in Latin America: The beginning or the end of Latin America’s ‘Continental Integration’? Atlantic Future Scientific Paper 20.Google Scholar
  29. Kacowicz, A. (2015). Regional governance and global governance: Possible links, alternative explanations, and the Latin American case, 1991–2015. Submitted for publication.Google Scholar
  30. Kupchan, C. A. (2006). The new Transatlantic interregionalism and the end of the Atlantic Alliance. In H. Hänggi, J. Rüland, & R. Roloff (Eds.), Interregionalism and international relations. London/New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  31. Laursen, F. (2003). Theoretical perspectives on comparative regional integration. In F. Laursen (Ed.), Comparative regional integration: Theoretical perspectives (pp. 3–28). Aldershot: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  32. Le Gloannec, A.-M. (2004). The unilateralist temptation Germany’s foreign policy after the Cold War. Internationale Politik und Gesellschaft, 1, 27–39.Google Scholar
  33. Lindberg, L. N. (1963). The political dynamics of European economic integration. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  34. MAE, Ministero degli Affari Esteri. (2012). Interview with a Diplomat who supported the Italian government delegation to the 2013 EU-Latin America and the Caribbean Summit. Santiago de Chile, 14th September.Google Scholar
  35. Maihold, G. (2010). La productividad del proceso de cumbres euro-latinoamericanas. Una evaluación a diez años de rio. In G. Caetano (Ed.), Las Negociaciones entre América Latina y el Caribe con la Unión Europea (pp. 21–60). Montevideo: Ediciones Trilce.Google Scholar
  36. Malamud, A. (2013). Overlapping regionalism, no integration: Conceptual issues and the Latin American experience. EUI Working Papers, RSCAS 2013/20.Google Scholar
  37. Malamud, A., & Gardini, G. L. (2012). Has regionalism peaked? the Latin American quagmire and its lessons. The International Spectator, 47(1), 123–140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Mattheis, F. (2014). New regionalism in the South: Mercosur and SADC in a comparative and interregional perspective. Leipzig: Universitätsverlag Leipzig.Google Scholar
  39. Melissen, J. (2003). Summit diplomacy coming of age. Discussion papers in diplomacy, Netherlands Institute of International relations “Clingendael”.Google Scholar
  40. MinRel 1, Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores de la Republica de Chile. (2012). Interview with a Diplomat responsible for the logistics of the 2013 EU-Latin America and the Caribbean Summit. Santiago de Chile, 13th September.Google Scholar
  41. MinRel 2, Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores de la Republica de Chile. (2012). Interview with a Diplomat responsible for the organisation of the 2013 EU-Latin America and the Caribbean Summit. Santiago de Chile, 20th September.Google Scholar
  42. MinRel 3, Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores de la Republica de Chile. (2012). Interview with a Diplomat responsible for the organisation of the 2013 EU-Latin America and the Caribbean Summit. Santiago de Chile, 19th September.Google Scholar
  43. Nye, J. N. (1968). International regionalism. Boston: Little, Brown & Co.Google Scholar
  44. O’Siochru, S. (2004). Civil society participation in the WSIS process: Promises and reality. Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, 18(3), 330–344.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Peake, S. (2002). The Jo’Burg Summit: What did it really mean for renewables? Refocus, 3(6), 46–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Peña, F. (2010). Ante las nuevas circunstancias internacionales: experiencias y futuro de las relaciones América Latina y Caribe con la Unión Europea. In G. Caetano (Ed.), Las Negociaciones entre América Latina y el Caribe con la Unión Europea (pp. 61–70). Montevideo: Ediciones Trilce.Google Scholar
  47. Roloff, R. (1998). Globalisierung, Regionalisierung und Gleichgewicht. In C. Masala & R. Roloff (Eds.), Herausforderungen der Realpolitik (pp. 61–94). Koln: SYH-Verlag.Google Scholar
  48. Rüland, J., & Bechle, K. (2014). Defending state-centric regionalism through mimicry and localisation: regional parliamentary bodies in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and Mercosur. Journal of International Relations and Development, 17(1), 61–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Saldías, O. (2010). Networks, courts and regional integration. Explaining the establishment of the Andean Court of Justice. KFG working paper, 20, Free University of Berlin.Google Scholar
  50. Santander, S. (2010). EU-LA relations: from interregionalism to bilateralism? Working paper # 29, CAEI – Centro Argentino de Estudios Internacionales.Google Scholar
  51. Sberro, S. (2013). After the first EU-CELAC summit in Santiago: A new beginning for the bi-regional strategic association? Paper presented at the European Union Studies Association (EUSA) Conference. Baltimore, May 9–11.Google Scholar
  52. Schimmelfennig, F. (2003). The EU, NATO and the integration of Europe. Rules and Rhetoric. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Schmitter, P. C. (2010). Governance arrangements for sustainability: A regional perspective. Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, 10(1), 85–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Schulz, M., Söderbaum, F., & Ojendal, J. (Eds.). (2001). Regionalization in a globalizing world: A comparative perspective on forms, actors and processes. London/New York: Zed Books.Google Scholar
  55. Söderbaum, F. (2012). Interregionalism. In G. Ritzer (Ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell encyclopedia of globalization (pp. 1200–1202). Chichester: Wiley.Google Scholar
  56. Söderbaum, F., & Van Langenhove, L. (2005). Introduction: The EU as a global actor and the role of interregionalism. Journal of European Integration, 27(3), 249–262.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Tovias, A. (2008). The brave new world of cross-regionalism. CEPII Working Paper No. 2008-03.Google Scholar
  58. Whitehead, L., & Barahona de Brito, A. (2005). Las cumbres mundiales y sus versiones latinoamericanas: ¿Haciendo una montaña de un grano de arena? América Latina Hoy, 40, 15–27.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-NürnbergErlangenGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Social Sciences of the University of LisbonLisbonPortugal

Personalised recommendations