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Afterword: Tacit Knowledge and Affect—Soft Ethnography and Shared Domains

  • Belinda MiddleweekEmail author
  • John Tulloch
Chapter

Abstract

The Afterword highlights the range of creative methodological approaches and practices in screen production research explored in this book. While the majority of contributors reflect on the production phase of their research projects, the Afterword suggests an alternative approach in the absence of ‘being there’ on set. Using ‘soft ethnography’ to analyse the controversial film Blue Is the Warmest Colour, we focus on some key ‘authors’ (including performers) to examine the flow and feedback between different authorial ‘signatures’ revealed by after-the-event interviews and textual reading. Whether properly ethnographic, ‘cognitive two-step’, or our own case study of ‘soft ethnography’, we share an important contemporary upsurge in research that emphasizes a reflexive approach to tacit knowledge, embodiment and affect

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Technology SydneyNSWAustralia
  2. 2.Charles Sturt University and University of NewcastleNSWAustralia

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