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Case Study: Balancing Change and Continuity—The Case of the Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan

  • John Kirkland
Chapter

Abstract

Scholarship programs need to be durable; they benefit greatly from prestige and recognition built up over time. Equally, they need the flexibility to respond to changing needs. This chapter describes how the Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan has balanced these needs over the past 50 years. After describing the origins of the Plan, the chapter outlines how attitudes have changed toward both scholarships and the Commonwealth, and their impact on the Plan. Outlining the move toward development objectives in recent years, the author defines key characteristics of ‘development’, rather than ‘public diplomacy’ and ‘merit-based’ scholarship programs, before considering outcomes and methods of assessing the impact of the scholarships. The evidence suggests that this has been significant, although in ways different to those envisaged by the founders.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Kirkland
    • 1
  1. 1.Association of Commonwealth UniversitiesLondonUK

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