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The Impact of China on South America Political and Economic Development

  • Steen Christensen
Chapter
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

The analysis focuses on China’s relations with, and impact on, South American since the beginning of the twenty-first century. While emphasizing bilateral economic relations, the analysis looks into a more comprehensive set of interconnected issues, where China’s impact has been felt, namely also on geopolitics, alliance patterns in international politics, and how domestic politics in South American countries relate to relations with China. The analysis compares three types of South American countries. The typologies differ in terms of economic policy and foreign policy and in terms of their economic models of development. It is argued that China’s impact in the region has been significant but has varied as a function of South American governments’ own policies and to some degree as a function of political and developmental characteristics of its South American partners.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steen Christensen
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut for Kultur og Globale StudierAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark

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