Advertisement

Teaching the Theory and Practice of Literary Translation Across Multiple Languages

  • Keyne Cheshire
  • Scott Denham
  • Amanda Ewington
  • Kyra A. Kietrys
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Translating and Interpreting book series (PTTI)

Abstract

“The Theory and Practice of Literary Translation,” a team-taught upper-level seminar for undergraduates at a liberal arts college, serves a strategic purpose within the context of an institutional curriculum. Since it demands that faculty and students cross traditional disciplinary lines for a common intellectual and creative aim, this course draws participants with expertise in different source languages and from different departments and programs. As such, the authors consider it among their most unifying and cooperative pedagogical experiences. This chapter discusses the rationale for the course, the possibility of—and merit in—teaching without fluency in every language represented, some logistics of course design and management, and the rich and often unforeseen professional development that the enterprise has availed its faculty.

Keywords

Theory-informed translating Curriculum internationalization Cultural awareness Teaching literary translation 

References

  1. Apter, Emily. 2006. ‘Untranslatable’ Algeria: The Politics of Linguicide. In The Translation Zone: A New Comparative Literature, 94–108. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Biggs, John B., and Catherine Tang. 2011. Teaching for Quality Learning at University: What the Student Does. 4th ed. Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill Education.Google Scholar
  3. Fink, L. Dee. 2013. Creating Significant Learning Experiences: An Integrated Approach to Designing College Courses. 2nd ed. Somerset: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
  4. Grossman, Edith. 2010. Why Translation Matters. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Heim, Michael Henry. 2014. Varieties of English for the Literary Translator. In A Companion to Translation Studies, ed. Sandra Bermann and Catherine Porter, 454–466. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Logan, George M. ed. 2011. Utopia by Thomas More. Translated by George M. Logan, ix–xii. New York: Norton & Company.Google Scholar
  7. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. 2011. Denying the Contrary: More’s Use of Litotes in the Utopia. In Utopia, ed. and trans. George M. Logan, 220–228. New York: Norton & Company.Google Scholar
  8. Remnick, David. 2005. The Translation Wars. The New Yorker, November 7.Google Scholar
  9. Weinberger, Eliot. 1987. 19 Ways of Looking at Wang Wei. Mt. Kisco: Moyer Bell.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keyne Cheshire
    • 1
  • Scott Denham
    • 1
  • Amanda Ewington
    • 1
  • Kyra A. Kietrys
    • 1
  1. 1.Davidson CollegeDavidsonUSA

Personalised recommendations