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Subnational Conflict Mitigation: Networks, Innovations, and the Uncertain Place of ASEAN

  • Linda Quayle
Chapter

Abstract

Subnational conflict remains a serious challenge for Southeast Asia. Yet the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is still groping for a meaningful role in this area, and most of the load is shouldered by individual regional states, external players, and various civil society entities. Informed by case-studies of Mindanao and Aceh, this chapter argues that conflict mitigation efforts are characterized both by innovations (particularly in the areas of hybrid mediation support, civilian peacekeeping, and peace education) and by highly complex networks (in which the roles of ‘non-state’ and ‘state’ actors are often very blurred). In light of these innovations and networks, the chapter advances some modest proposals for ASEAN’s future development in this area, aimed at increasing its chances of weathering at least some of the storms of transitional polycentrism.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The author sincerely thanks Alan Chong; the cited interviewees; former colleagues at Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta; Reza Rezeki, who provided research assistance; and Kartini Tahir, a former teacher in Tawi-Tawi, who contributed very helpful perspectives on madaris and BEAM.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Quayle
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Nottingham (Malaysia Campus)SemenyihMalaysia

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