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A Real Case-Based Study Exploring Influence of Human Age and Gender on Drivers’ Behavior and Traffic Safety

  • Nazha R. Ghadban
  • Galal M. Abdella
  • Khalifa N. Al-Khalifa
  • Abdel Magid Hamouda
  • Khadija B. Abdur-Rouf
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 597)

Abstract

The demand for understanding the functional relationship between changes in traffic safety level and human-related factors has increased remarkably due to a steady increase in population and traffic volume. Motor vehicle crashes can cause a serious impact on the victims, families, and the community resulting in instability of family and large socio-economic costs to society and healthcare service. Statistical studies of drivers’ behavior as a function of some of the human characteristics, in particular, have become increasingly important for establishing an evidence-based framework through which transportation and healthcare authorities can develop innovative solutions to mitigate serious consequences of risky driving. This paper uses a real-world dataset to analyze the relationship between the human characteristics and both the behavior and risk-level. In addition to that, this paper conducts several analytical studies to investigate the extent to which the risky driving behavior may affect the severity of the crash and human injury.

Keywords

Traffic safety Risky driving behavior Road crashes Human factors in traffic safety 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nazha R. Ghadban
    • 1
  • Galal M. Abdella
    • 1
  • Khalifa N. Al-Khalifa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Abdel Magid Hamouda
    • 2
  • Khadija B. Abdur-Rouf
    • 1
  1. 1.Qatar Transportation and Traffic Safety Center (QTTSC)Qatar UniversityDohaQatar
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical and Industrial EngineeringQatar UniversityDohaQatar

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