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The Impact of the Financial Crisis on Greece’s Defense Diplomacy

  • Fotini Bellou
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the implications of the Greek financial crisis on the country’s defense diplomacy. Although defense budgets have been reduced in recent years almost in all European governments, Greece’s defense expenditures have experienced a dramatic reduction, prompting Athens to reconsider its defense priorities, including its defense diplomacy. For this reason, Greece has started to fashion the triptych of rationalization, optimization and prioritization in filtering its policies related to defense diplomacy, including its participation in peace support operations or other cooperative military initiatives. Emphasis is given to augmenting its training and operational military cooperation in the context of the evolving commitments as a member of NATO and the EU. Yet, the recent strategic regional environment including the need for managing the migration crisis has revealed the importance of defense diplomacy and its credentials which were previously not fully appreciated.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fotini Bellou
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MacedoniaThessalonikiGreece

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