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An Invitation to Critical Sociology

  • Fuyuki Kurasawa
Chapter

Abstract

The introduction puts forth a vision of critical sociology that moves beyond the divide between empirical research and theory, as well as between scientific analysis and normative critique, by proposing a research agenda organized around three substantive themes: recasting the character of social relations and interactions in contemporary society, uncovering institutional and discursive configurations of socio-economic and political power, and understanding emerging cultural practices and their social implications. Hence, a critical sociology grounded in the themes of society, power, and culture navigates among four conceptual pairings in the human sciences: artistic versus scientific, idiographic versus nomothetic, normative versus analytical, and hermeneutical versus scientific. The chapter then proposes a set of analytical principles to guide critically minded sociological research: sociocentric ontology, social constructivist epistemology, a priori analytical indeterminacy, perspectivalist methodology, and theoretical pluralism.

Notes

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank the members of the Canadian Network for Critical Sociology, to whom I am indebted for their comments and feedback on earlier versions of this chapter. Research and writing of it were made possible through a SSHRC Standard Research Grant and a SSHRC Insight Grant.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fuyuki Kurasawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyYork UniversityTorontoCanada

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