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Making Gamification Easy for the Professor: Decoupling Game and Content with the StudyNow Mobile App

  • Matthias Feldotto
  • Thomas John
  • Dennis Kundisch
  • Paul Hemsen
  • Katrin Klingsieck
  • Alexander Skopalik
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10243)

Abstract

Many university students struggle with motivational problems, and gamification has the potential to address these problems. However, gamification is hardly used in education, because current approaches to gamification require instructors to engage in the time-consuming preparation of their course contents for use in quizzes, mini-games and the like. Drawing on research on limited attention and present bias, we propose a “lean” approach to gamification, which relies on gamifying learning activities (rather than learning contents) and increasing their salience. In this paper, we present the app StudyNow that implements such a lean gamification approach. With this app, we aim to enable more students and instructors to benefit from the advantages of gamification.

Keywords

Gamification Limited attention Present bias Mobile app Education 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthias Feldotto
    • 1
  • Thomas John
    • 1
  • Dennis Kundisch
    • 1
  • Paul Hemsen
    • 1
  • Katrin Klingsieck
    • 1
  • Alexander Skopalik
    • 1
  1. 1.Paderborn UniversityPaderbornGermany

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