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My Grandpa and I “Gotta Catch ‘Em All.” A Research Design on Intergenerational Gaming Focusing on Pokémon Go

  • Francesca ComunelloEmail author
  • Simone Mulargia
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10298)

Abstract

Intergenerational gaming is gaining growing scholarly attention, as it can be considered a means of fostering relationships between younger and older players, a way of overcoming real or perceived differences between generations, a chance to (re)negotiate norms and roles, and a way to question age-related stereotypes. In this paper, we conduct a literature review on intergenerational gaming and pervasive gaming and present a research design to conduct an intergenerational gaming study focusing on Pokémon Go. We aim at exploring gaming practices, role negotiations, and the presence/absence of age-related stereotypes. To reach our goals, we elaborate and evaluate different research methods and tools, discussing their strengths and weaknesses and designing further research steps.

Keywords

Intergenerational gaming Pokémon Go Location-based mobile gaming Augmented reality games 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of HumanitiesLUMSA UniversityRomeItaly
  2. 2.Department of Communication and Social ResearchSapienza University of RomeRomeItaly

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