Advertisement

Introduction to ‘Planning Support Science for Smarter Urban Futures’

  • Stan GeertmanEmail author
  • Andrew Allan
  • Chris Pettit
  • John Stillwell
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography book series (LNGC)

Abstract

This introductory chapter establishes the context for subsequent contributions by outlining some of the major physical and social challenges that confront planners and policy-makers in different parts of the world. It then explains how the development of planning support systems has evolved into a much broader field of Planning Support Science which intersects with the emergence of data science, big data, data analytics and new urban science, thereby creating new opportunities for innovative solutions to support progress towards the development of smarter and more resilient urban futures. The structure of the book is clarified and short summary reviews of each chapter provide a composite portrait of the contents as a whole.

Keywords

Planning support systems Smart cities Urban futures 

References

  1. Allen, E. (2001). INDEX: Software for community indicators. In R. K. Brail & R. E. Klosterman (Eds.), Planning support systems (pp. 229–261). Redlands, CA: ESRI Press.Google Scholar
  2. Allen, E. (2008). Clicking toward better outcomes: Experience with INDEX, 1994–2006. In R. K. Brail (Ed.), Planning support systems for cities and regions (pp. 139–166). Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.Google Scholar
  3. Arciniegas, G., Janssen, R., & Rietveld, P. (2013). Effectiveness of collaborative map-based decision support tools: Results of an experiment. Environmental Modelling and Software, 39, 159–175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Batty, M. (1995). Planning support systems and the new logic of computation. Regional Development Dialogue, 16, 1–17.Google Scholar
  5. Batty, M. (2013). The new science of cities. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  6. BITRE. (2015). Traffic and congestion cost trends for Australian capital cities. Information Sheet 74, Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics, Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development, Commonwealth Government, Canberra. Accessed February 12, 2017 from https://bitre.gov.au/publications/2015/files/is_074.pdf
  7. Couclelis, H. (2005). “Where has the future gone?’’ Rethinking the role of integrated land-use models in spatial planning. Environment and Planning A, 37(8), 1353–1371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. da Silva, J. (2016). City resilience index. ARUP. Accessed February 2017 from http://publications.arup.com/publications/c/city_resilience_index
  9. FAO. (2015). The State of food insecurity in the world. In Meeting the 2015 International Hunger Targets: Taking Stock of Uneven Progress. Rome: FAO. Accessed February 21, 2017 from http://www.fao.org/3/a-i4646e.pdf
  10. Geertman, S. (2006). Potentials for planning support: A planning-conceptual approach. Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, 33, 863–880.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Geertman, S. (2013). Planning support: From systems to science. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Urban Design and Planning, 166(1), 50–59.Google Scholar
  12. Geertman, S., Ferreira, J., Goodspeed, R., & Stillwell, J. (Eds.). (2015). Planning support systems and smart cities. Lecture Notes in GeoInformation and Cartography. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  13. Geertman, S., & Stillwell, J. (Eds.). (2003). Planning support systems in practice. Advances in Spatial Science. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
  14. Geertman, S., & Stillwell, J. (Eds.). (2009). Planning support systems best practice and new methods. The GeoJournal Library 95. Dordrecht: Springer Science & Business Media.Google Scholar
  15. Geertman, S., Toppen, F., & Stillwell, J. (Eds.). (2013). Planning support systems for sustainable urban development. Lecture Notes in GeoInformation and Cartography. Heidelberg: Springer.Google Scholar
  16. Harris, B., & Batty, M. (1993). Locational models, geographic information and planning support systems. Journal of Planning Education and Research, 12(3), 184–198.Google Scholar
  17. Klosterman, R. E. (1997). Planning support systems: A new perspective on computer-aided planning. Journal of Planning Education and Research, 17, 45–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Klosterman, R. E. (1999). The What if? collaborative planning support system. Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, 26, 393–408.Google Scholar
  19. Kwartler, M., & Bernard, R. (2001). CommunityViz: An integrated planning support system. In R. K. Brail & R. E. Klosterman (Eds.), Planning support systems (pp. 285–308). Redlands: ESRI Press.Google Scholar
  20. Lee, D. B. (1973). Requiem for large-scale models. Journal of the American Institute of Planners, 39(3), 163–178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Marsden, R. (2015). A web-based information system for planning support in Barnsley. Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy, 8(2), 131–153.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Pettit, C. J., Barton, J., Goldie, X., Sinnott, R., Stimson, R., & Kvan, T. (2015a). The Australian urban intelligence network supporting smart cities. In S. Geertman, J. Ferreira, R. Goodspeed, & J. Stillwell (Eds.), Planning support systems and smart cities (pp. 243–259). Lecture Notes in GeoInformation and Cartography. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  23. Pettit, C. J., Klosterman, R. E., Delaney, P., Whitehead, A. L., Kujala, H., Bromage, A., et al. (2015b). The online What if? planning support system: A land suitability application in Western Australia. Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy., 8(2), 93–112.Google Scholar
  24. Pettit, C. J., Klosterman, R. E., Nino-Ruiz, M., Widjaja, I., Tomko, M., & Sinnott, R. (2013). The online what if? Planning support system. In S. Geertman, F. Toppen, & J. Stillwell (Eds.), Planning support systems for sustainable urban development (pp. 349–362). Lecture Notes in GeoInformation and Cartography. Heidelberg: Springer.Google Scholar
  25. Pettit, C., Tice, A., & Randolph, B. (2017). Using an online spatial analytics workbench for understanding housing affordability in Sydney. In P. Thakuriah, N. Tilahun, & M. Zellner (Eds.), Seeing cities through big data: Research, methods and applications in urban informatics (pp. 233–255). Cham: Springer International Publishing.Google Scholar
  26. Rockefeller Foundation. (2015). 100 Resilience. Accessed February 2017 from https://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/our-work/topics/resilience/
  27. Russo, P., Costabile, F. M., Lanzilotti, R., & Pettit, C. J. (2015). Usability of planning support systems: An evaluation framework. In S. Geertman, J. Ferreira, R. Goodspeed, & J. Stillwell (Eds.), Planning support systems and smart cities (pp. 337–353). Lecture Notes in GeoInformation and Cartography. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  28. Sanderson, D. (2016). Urban disaster resiliences: New dimension from international practice in the built environment. In D. Sanderson, J. Kayden, & J. Leis (Eds.), Urban disaster resilience (pp. 3–15). New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.Google Scholar
  29. Thakuriah, P. V., Tilahun, N. Y., & Zellner, M. (2017). Introduction to seeing cities through big data: Research, methods and applications in urban informatics. In Thakuriah, P. V., Tilahun, N. Y., & Zellner, M. (Eds.), Seeing cities through big data: Research, methods and applications in urban informatics (pp. 1–9). Cham: Springer International Publishing.Google Scholar
  30. The Guardian Website. (2016). Smog refugees flee Chinese cities as ‘airpocalypse’ blights half a billion. Accessed February 15, 2017 from https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/21/smog-refugees-flee-chinese-cities-as-airpocalypse-blights-half-a-billion
  31. UN Habitat. (2003). The challenge of slums: Global report on human settlements, United Nations Human Settlements Programme. London: Earthscan.Google Scholar
  32. United Nations. (2014). World urbanization prospects: The 2014 revision, highlights. New York: United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division.Google Scholar
  33. United Nations. (2016). The World’s Cities in 2016—Data Booklet (ST/ESA/ SER.A/392). New York: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Accessed February 15, 2017 from http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/urbanization/the_worlds_cities_in_2016_data_booklet.pdf
  34. Vonk, G., Geertman, S., & Schot, P. (2005). Bottlenecks blocking widespread usage of planning support systems. Environment and Planning A, 37(5), 909–924.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Waddell, P. (2002). UrbanSim: Modelling urban development for land use, transportation, and environmental planning. Journal of the American Planning Association, 68(3), 297–314.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. World Bank. (2016). The cost of air pollution: Strengthening the economic case for action. Washington, D.C.: World Bank Group. http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/781521473177013155/The-cost-of-air-pollution-strengthening-the-economic-case-for-action

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stan Geertman
    • 1
    Email author
  • Andrew Allan
    • 2
  • Chris Pettit
    • 3
  • John Stillwell
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Human Geography and Planning, Faculty of GeosciencesUtrecht UniversityUtrechtThe Netherlands
  2. 2.School of Art, Architecture and DesignUniversity of South AustraliaAdelaideAustralia
  3. 3.City Futures Research Centre, UNSWSydneyAustralia
  4. 4.School of GeographyUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK

Personalised recommendations