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Tough Guys: Facing Violence Against Men with Disabilities

  • Marsha SaxtonEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Little attention has been given to the experiences of abuse by men with disabilities. A few qualitative and quantitative studies are revealing much higher than anticipated rates of abuse for this population. This piece will investigate key issues for disabled men in a range of forms of abuse, such as physical, verbal, and financial, which can occur in relationships with intimate partners, family members, and service providers. The unique life experiences of men who depend upon personal assistance must be considered in understanding the spectrum of abuse. Exploration of strategies for intervention and prevention will assist professionals and community services in reducing this abuse. Recommendations for policy and further research are offered.

Keywords

Men with disabilities Interpersonal violence Caretaker violence Male survivors Spectrum of abuse Prevention of abuse Intervention with male survivors Personal care assistants Masculinity Disclosure of abuse Power dynamics Resilience 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Appreciation is offered to members of the research team who produced the article, We’re All Little John Waynes: Elizabeth McNeff, Laurie Powers, Mary Oschwald, and Mary Ann Curry. Our male team’s researchers with disabilities, Mark Limont and Jack Benson, have since died. This chapter is dedicated to their work and lives as disability rights activists.

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Further Readings and Resources

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  2. Center of Excellence on Elder Abuse and Neglect: Help Veterans Protect Themselves from Abuse. http://www.centeronelderabuse.org/veterans.asp
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  5. Sherry, M. (2012). Does anyone really hate disabled people? London, UK: Ashgate Publishing.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.World Institute on Disability, Disability Studies Program, University of California, BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA

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