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Abstract

Corruption has not been a major field of criminological analysis, and, in nations that have comparatively very little corruption such as New Zealand and Australia there is not a lot of work by criminologists. However, corruption does exist, and it causes considerable harm, no matter how well developed the country may be. There are different ways of analysing corruption and combining these with survey data provides a basis for action. This chapter examines the nature of corruption generally and the methods of responding to and preventing corruption in New Zealand and Australia.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Public PolicyFlinders UniversityAdelaideAustralia

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