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A Serious Game Architecture for Green Mobility

  • Pratheep K. ParanthamanEmail author
  • Gautam R. Dange
  • Francesco Bellotti
  • Riccardo Berta
  • Alessandro De Gloria
  • Ermanno Di Zitti
  • Stefano Massucco
  • Giuseppe Sciutto
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 429)

Abstract

Good driving behavior is a significant factor for road safety and green mobility. A countermeasure to overcome the coarse driving behavior and a methodology to captivate optimal driving traits are discussed in this work. For which, the serious games concept was exploited to improvise the driver performance by deploying diversified game logics (scores, incentives and live game for performance evolution) on a smartphone-based user interface. The application was tested in ASTA ZERO (Active Safety Test Area) in Sweden. The tests comprised of variations (good and bad driving behavior) in driving pattern for analyzing the impact of the application on the driver performance.

Keywords

Serious games Service-oriented architecture Collaborative green mobility Mobile computing Infotainment systems 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pratheep K. Paranthaman
    • 1
    Email author
  • Gautam R. Dange
    • 1
  • Francesco Bellotti
    • 1
  • Riccardo Berta
    • 1
  • Alessandro De Gloria
    • 1
  • Ermanno Di Zitti
    • 1
  • Stefano Massucco
    • 1
  • Giuseppe Sciutto
    • 1
  1. 1.DITENUniversity of Genoa16145Italy

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