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Minorities in a Global Perspective

  • A. S. Bhalla
  • Dan Luo
Chapter

Abstract

This Chapter examines the status of minorities in a global perspective with illustrations from three case studies: Jammu and Kashmir in India and Tibet and Xinjiang in China. These cases are studied in the light of the global war on terror, the emergence of the Islamic State and economic and social globalization through international trade, foreign investment and global communications. The impact of globalization on minorities is examined via communications and changing consumer patterns. The issue of local ethnic and cultural identities in the face of globalization is also addressed.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CommugnySwitzerland
  2. 2.University of ReadingReadingUK

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