Advertisement

Language Development in Bilingual Spanish-Catalan Children with and Without Specific Language Impairment: A Longitudinal Perspective

  • Eva Aguilar-MediavillaEmail author
  • Lucia Buil-Legaz
  • Raül López-Penadés
  • Daniel Adrover-Roig
Chapter
Part of the Literacy Studies book series (LITS, volume 14)

Abstract

The present chapter explores both the cognitive and linguistic development of bilingual children with and without Specific Language Impairment (SLI), and focuses on Spanish and Catalan languages. We first describe some similarities between Monolingual and Bilingual language acquisition and how Bilingual children reach most of the milestones at the same age as monolinguals, despite having less exposure to each language separately. We refer to different characteristics of simultaneous bilingual language acquisition and discuss some variables that influence this process, such as the linguistic and non-linguistic characteristics that influence bilingual language acquisition and proficiency. One such variable is the status of each language in the social context. We highlight the advantages and disadvantages of being bilingual when compared with monolinguals in cognitive tasks related to information access and storage in long-term memory. We present several studies describing the development of monolingual children with SLI to establish a basis for comparing bilingual children with SLI. We mention some studies which have explored cognitive abilities in bilingual children with SLI; some studies finding compensating abilities and some others finding a “bilingual disadvantage”. We show several studies with different outcomes depending on the type of bilingualism, such as the differences between sequential bilinguals as compared to simultaneous bilingual children. Finally, we present a series of studies that have investigated phonological, morphosyntactic, lexical-semantic and pragmatic characteristics of bilingual Spanish-Catalan development in children with and without SLI. Executive functions related to both cognitive and language processing in bilingual Spanish-Catalan acquisition are also shown. The chapter ends with some research which have analyzed reading abilities and social interaction in this population.

Keywords

Spanish language acquisition Morphology Syntax Gender agreement Complex grammar 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Spanish government and the ERDF: European Regional Development Fund [SEJ2006-12616] and [EDU2013-45174-P].

References

  1. Adrover-Roig, D., & Ansaldo, A. I. (2009). El bilingüismo como factor de protección en el envejecimiento cognitivo. Revista Latinoamericana de Neuropsicología, 1(1), 1–15.Google Scholar
  2. Aguado, G., Cuetos-Vega, F., Domezáin, M., & Pascual, B. (2006). Repetition of pseudo-words in Spanish children with specific language disorder: A psycholinguistic marker. Revista de Neurologia, 43(Suppl 1), S201–S208.Google Scholar
  3. Águila Martínez, E., Ramon-Casas, M., Pons, F., & Bosch-Galcerán, L. (2005). Efecto de la exposición bilingüe sobre el desarrollo léxico inicial. In A. Mayor-Cinca, B. Zubiauz-de-Pedro, & E. Díez-Villoria (Eds.), Estudios sobre la adquisición del lenguaje. Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca.Google Scholar
  4. Aguilar-Mediavilla, E. (2013). Comparative analysis of the acquisition of syllabic structure and errors in preschool children with SLI. Anuario de Psicología. The UB Journal, 43(2), 237–252.Google Scholar
  5. Aguilar-Mediavilla, E., & Serra-Raventós, M. (2006). Phonological profile of Spanish-Catalan children with specific language impairment at age 4: Are there any changes over time? Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 58, 400–414.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Aguilar-Mediavilla, E., Sanz-Torrent, M., & Serra-Raventós, M. (2002). A comparative study of the phonology of pre-school children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI), Language Delay (LD) and Normal Acquisition. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 16(8), 573–596.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Aguilar-Mediavilla, E., Sanz-Torrent, M., & Serra-Raventós, M. (2007). Influence of phonology on morpho-syntax in Romance languages in children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 43, 325–347.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Aguilar-Mediavilla, E., Buil-Legaz, L., Pérez-Castelló, J. A., Rigo-Carratalà, E., & Adrover-Roig, D. (2014). Early preschool processing abilities predict subsequent reading outcomes in bilingual Spanish-Catalan children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Journal of Communication Disorders, 50, 19–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Aguilar-Mediavilla, E., Buil-Legaz, L., Pérez-Castelló, J. A., López-Penadés, R., & Adrover-Roig, D. (in press). Code-switching and code-mixing in bilingual Spanish-Catalan children with and without specific language impairment. In C. dos Santos & L. de Almeida (Eds.), Bilingualism ans specific language impairment. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  10. American Pshychiatric Association. (2013). DSM-5: Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Andreu Barrachina, L., Sanz-Torrent, M., Buil-Legaz, L., & Macwhinney, B. (2012). Effect of verb argument structure on picture naming in children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 47(6), 637–653.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Andreu Barrachina, L., Sanz-Torrent, M., Guàrdia Olmos, J., & Macwhinney, B. (2011). Narrative comprehension and production in children with SLI: An eye movement study. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 25(9), 767–783.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Andreu Barrachina, L., Sanz-Torrent, M., Guàrdia Olmos, J., & MacWhinney, B. (2013). The formulation of argument structure in SLI: An eye-movement study. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 27(2), 111–133.Google Scholar
  14. Armon-Lotem, S., de Jong, J., & Meir, N. (2015). Language impairment testing in multilingual settings. Bristol: Multilingual matters.Google Scholar
  15. Auza, A., & Morgan, G. P. (2013). El uso del artículo en niños hispanohablantes con trastorno específico del lenguaje. Revista Chilena de Fonoaudiología, 12, 03–20.Google Scholar
  16. Bedore, L. M., Peña, E. D., García, M., & Cortez, C. (2005, July). Conceptual versus Monolingual scoring : When does it make a difference ? Language. Speach and Hearing Services in Schools, 36, 188–200.Google Scholar
  17. Beitchman, J., Brownlie, E. B., Inglis, A., Wild, J., Ferguson, B., Schachter, D., et al. (1996). Seve-year follow-up of speech/language impaired and control children: Psychiatric outcome. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 37(8), 961–970.Google Scholar
  18. Bialystok, E. (1999). Cognitive complexity and attentiona control in the bilingual mind. Child Development, 70, 633–644.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Bialystok, E. (2005). Consequences of bilingualism for cognitive development. In E. Bialystok (Ed.), Handbook of bilingualism (pp. 417–432). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Bialystok, E. (2009). Bilingualism: The good, the bad, and the indifferent. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 12(01), 3–11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Bilson, S., Yoshida, H., Tran, C. D., Woods, E. a., & Hills, T. T. (2015). Semantic facilitation in bilingual first language acquisition. Cognition, 140, 122–134.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Bishop, D. V. M., & Edmundson, A. (1987). Language impaired 4-years-old distinguishing transient from persistent impairment. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 52, 156–173.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Blom, E., de Jong, J., Orgassa, A., Baker, A., & Weerman, F. (2013). Verb inflection in monolingual Dutch and sequential bilingual Turkish-Dutch children with and without SLI. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 48(4), 382–393.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Blom, E., Küntay, A. C., Messer, M., Verhagen, J., & Leseman, P. (2014). The benefits of being bilingual: Working memory in bilingual Turkish-Dutch children. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 128, 105–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Bosch-Galcerán, L., & Sebastián-Gallés, N. (1997). Native-language recognition abilities in 4-month-old infants from monolingual and bilingual environments. Cognition, 65(1), 33–69. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=psyh&AN=1997-38635-003&lang=es&site=ehost-live.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Bosch-Galcerán, L., & Serra-Raventós, M. (1997). Grammatical morphology deficits of Spanish-speaking children with specific language impairment. In A. Baker, M. Beers, G. Bol, J. de Jong, & G. Leemans (Eds.), Child language disorders in a cross-linguistic perspective: Proceedings of the fourth symposium of the European group on child language disorders (pp. 33–45). Amsterdam: Institute for General Linguistics at the University of Amsterdam.Google Scholar
  27. Botting, N., & Conti-Ramsden, G. (2008). The role of language, social cognition, and social skill in the functional social outcomes of young adolescents with and without a history of SLI. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 26(2), 281–300.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Buil-Legaz, L., Adrover-Roig, D., & Aguilar-Mediavilla, E. (in press-a). Longitudinal trajectories of the representation and access to phonological information in bilingual children with specific language impairment. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.Google Scholar
  29. Buil-Legaz, L., Aguilar-Mediavilla, E., & Rodríguez-Ferreiro, J. (in press-b). Oral morphosyntactic competence as a predictor of reading comprehension in children with specific language impairment. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders.Google Scholar
  30. Buil-Legaz, L., Aguilar-Mediavilla, E., & Rodríguez-Ferreiro, J. (2015). Reading skills in young adolescents with a history of Specific Language Impairment: The role of early semantic capacity. Journal of Communication Disorders, 58, 14–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Buil-Legaz, L., Pérez-Castelló, J. A., Adrover-Roig, D., & Aguilar-Mediavilla, E. (2016). Referential communication effectiveness in Spanish-Catalan children with and without Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Anuario de Psicología. The UB Journal of Psychology, 46(1), 31–40.Google Scholar
  32. Carlson, S. M., & Meltzoff, A. N. (2008). Bilingual experience and executive functioning in young children. Developmental Science, 11(2), 282–298.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Casalini, C., Brizzolara, D., Chilosi, A. M., Cipriani, P., Marcolini, S., Pecini, C., et al. (2007). Non-word repetition in children with specific language impiarment: A deficit in phonological working memory or in long term verbal knowledge? Cortex, 43(6), 769–776.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Cattani, A., Abbot-Smith, K., Farag, R., Krott, A., Arreckx, F., Dennis, I., & Floccia, C. (2014). How much exposure to English is necessary for a bilingual toddler to perform like a monolingual peer in language tests? International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 49(6), 649–671.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Catts, H. W., Fey, M. E., Zhang, X., & Tomblin, J. B. (1999). Language basis of reading and reading disabilities: Evidence from a longitudinal investigation. Scientific Studies of Reading, 3, 331–361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Claessen, M., Leitão, S., Kane, R., & Williams, C. J. (2013). Phonological processing skills in specific language impairment. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 15(5), 471–483.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Clahsen, H., Rothweiler, M., Sterner, F., & Chilla, S. (2014). Linguistic markers of specific language impairment in bilingual children: The case of verb morphology. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 28(9), 709–721.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Conti-Ramsden, G. (2008). Heterogeneity of Specific Language Impairment (SLI): Outcomes in Adolescence. In C. F. Norbury, J. B. Tomblin, & D. V. M. Bishop (Eds.), Understanding developmental language disorders: From theory to practice (pp. 115–129). New York: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
  39. Conti-Ramsden, G., & Botting, N. (1999). Classification of children with specific language impairment: Longitudinal considerations. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 42, 1195–1204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Conti-Ramsden, G., Botting, N., & Faragher, B. (2001). Psycholinguistic markers for specific language impairment (SLI). Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 42(6), 741–748.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Conti-Ramsden, G., St Clair, M. C., Pickles, A., & Durkin, K. (2012). Developmental trajectories of verbal and nonverbal skills in individuals with a history of specific language impairment: From childhood to adolescence. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 55(6), 1716–1735.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Crutchley, A., Botting, N., & Conti-Ramsden, G. (1997). Bilingualism and specific language impairment in children attending language units. European Journal of Disorders of Communication, 32(2), 267–276.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. De Houwer, A., Bornstein, M. H., & Putnick, D. L. (2013). A bilingual–monolingual comparison of young children’s vocabulary size: Evidence from comprehension and production. Applied PsychoLinguistics, 35(06), 1189–1211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Díaz, B., Erdocia, K., de Menezes, R. F., Mueller, J. L., Sebastián-Gallés, N., & Laka, I. (2016, February). Electrophysiological correlates of second-language syntactic processes are related to native and second language distance regardless of age of acquisition. Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 133.Google Scholar
  45. Ebbels, S. H., Dockrell, J. E., & van der Lely, H. K. J. (2012). Non-word repetition in adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI). International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 47(3), 257–273.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Elin-Thordardottir. (2011). The relationship between bilingual exposure and vocabulary development. International Journal of Bilingualism, 15(4), 426–445.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Elin-Thordardottir, & Brandeker, M. (2013). The effect of bilingual exposure versus language impairment on nonword repetition and sentence imitation scores. Journal of Communication Disorders, 46(1), 1–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Engel de Abreu, P. M. J., Cruz-Santos, A., & Puglisi, M. L. (2014). Specific language impairment in language-minority children from low-income families. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 49(6), 736–747.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Gathercole, V. C. M. (2007). Miami and North Wales, so far and yet so near: Constructivist account of morpho-syntactic development in bilingual children. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 10(3), 224–247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Gathercole, V. C. M., & Thomas, E. M. (2009). Bilingual first-language development: Dominant language takeover, threatened minority language take-up. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 12(2), 213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Gavarró, A. (2012). Third person clitic production and omission in Romance SLI. In P. Guijarro Fuentes & P. Larrañaga (Eds.), Pronouns and clitics in early language (pp. 79–104). Berlin/New York: De Gruyter/Mouton.Google Scholar
  52. Genesee, F., & Nicoladis, E. (2006). Bilingual acquisition. In E. Hoff & M. Shatz (Eds.), Handobook of language development (pp. 1–34). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  53. Gildersleeve-Neumann, C., Kester, E., Davis, B., & Peña, E. D. (2008). English speech sound development in preschool-aged children from bilingual Spanish-English environments. Language, Speech and Hearing Services in Schools, 39(3), 314–328.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Girbau, D., & Schwartz, R. G. (2007). Non-word repetition in Spanish-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI). International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 42(1), 59–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Girbau, D., & Schwartz, R. G. (2008). Phonological working memory in Spanish-English bilingual children with and without specific language impairment. Journal of Communication Disorders, 41(2), 124–145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Gollan, T. H., & Acenas, L. A. (2004). What is a TOT? Cognate and translation effects on tip-of-the-tongue states in Spanish–English and Tagalog–English bilinguals. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 30, 246–269.Google Scholar
  57. Gollan, T. H., Montoya, R., Fennema-Notestine, C., & Morris, S. (2005). Bilingualism affects picture naming but not picture classification. Memory and Cognition, 33(7), 1220–1234.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Green, D. W. (1998). Mental control of the bilingual lexico–semantic system. Language & Cognition, 1, 67–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Grice, P. (1975). Studies in the way of words. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  60. Gutiérrez-Clellen, V., Simon-Cereijido, G., & Wagner, C. (2008). Bilingual children with language impairment: A comparison with monolinguals and second language learners. Applied PsychoLinguistics, 29(1), 3–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Gutiérrez-Clellen, V., Simon-Cereijido, G., & Erickson Leone, A. (2009). Codeswitching in bilingual children with specific language impairment. International Journal of Bilingualism, 13(1), 91–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Hakansson, G., Salameh, E., & Nettelbladt, U. (2003). Measuring language development in bilingual children: Swedish–Arabic children with and without language impairment. Linguistics, 41, 255–288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Holmström, K., Salameh, E.-K., Nettelbladt, U., & Dahlgren Sandberg, A. (2016). A descriptive study for lexical organisation of bilingual children with language impairment. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 18, 178–189.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Ivanova, I., & Costa, A. (2008). Does bilingualism hamper lexical access in speech production? Acta Psychologica, 127(2), 277–288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Johnson, C. J., Beitchman, J., Young, A., Escobar, M., Atkinson, L., Wilson, B., et al. (1999). Fourteen-year follow-up of children with and without speech language impairments: Speech language stability and outcomes. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 42(3), 744–760.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Katsos, N., Andrés Roqueta, C., Clemente Estevan, R. A., & Cummins, C. (2011). Are children with specific language impairment competent with the pragmatics and logic of quantification? Cognition, 119, 43–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Kelso, K., Fletcher, J., & Lee, P. (2007). Reading comprehension in children with specific language impairment: An examination of two subgroups. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 42(1), 39–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. King, K., & Fogle, L. (2009). La crianza de niños bilingües: preocupaciones comunes de los padres y las investigaciones actuales. CAL Digest, Febrero(Febrero), 1–4. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/6821877/La_crianza_de_ni%C3%B1os_biling%C3%BCes_preocupaciones_comunes_de_los_padres_y_las_investigaciones_actuales
  69. Kohnert, K. (2010). Bilingual children with primary language impairment: Issues: Evidence and implications for clinical actions. Journal of Communication Disorders, 43(6), 456–473.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Komeili, M., & Marshall, C. R. (2013). Sentence repetition as a measure of morphosyntax in monolingual and bilingual children. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 27(2), 152–162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Leonard, L. B. (2014a). Children with specific language impairment and their contribution to the study of language development. Journal of Child Language, 41(Suppl 1), 38–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Leonard, L. B. (2014b). Specific language impairment across languages. Child Development Perspectives, 8(1), 1–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Leonard, L. B. (2015). Specific language impairment (2nd ed.). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (MA).Google Scholar
  74. Lewis, P., Simons, G., & Fennig, C. (2013). Ethnologue. Dallas: SIL International.Google Scholar
  75. Lleó, C. (2002). The role of markedness in the acquisition of complex prosodic structures by German-Spanish bilinguals. International Journal of Bilingualism, 6(3), 291–313.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. Lleó, C., & Demuth, K. (1999). Prosodic constraints on the emergence of grammatical morphemes: Crosslinguistic evidence from Germaninc and Romance languages. In A. Greenhill (Ed.), BUCLD 23 Proceedings (pp. 407–418).Google Scholar
  77. MacLeod, A. A. N., & McCauley, R. J. (2003). The phonological abilities of bilingual children with Specific language Impairment: A descriptive analysis. Revue d’Orthophonie et d’Audiologie, 27(1), 29–44.Google Scholar
  78. Marton, K. (2008). Visuo-spatial processing and executive functions in children with specific language impairment. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 43(2), 181–200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Marton, K., Campanelli, L., Eichorn, N., Scheuer, J., & Yoom, J. (2014). Information processing and proactive interference in children with and without specific language impairment. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 57(1), 106–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. McArthur, G., & Castles, A. (2013). Phonological processing deficits in specific reading disability and specific language impairment: Same or different? Journal of Research in Reading, 36(3), 280–302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. Melby-Lervåg, M., & Lervåg, A. (2011). Cross-linguistic transfer of oral language, decoding, phonological awareness and reading comprehension: a meta-analysis of the correlational evidence. Journal of Research in Reading, 34(1), 114–135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  82. Messer, D. J., Dockrell, J. E., & Murphy, N. (2004). The relation between naming and literacy in children with word finding difficulties. Journal of Educational Psychology, 96, 462–470.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Oller, D. K., Eilers, R. E., Urbano, R., & Cobo-Lewis, A. B. (1997). Development of precursors to speech in infants exposed to two languages. Journal of Child Language, 24(2), 407–425.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Orgassa, A., & Weerman, F. (2008). Dutch gender in specific language impairment and second language acquisition. Second Language Research, 24(3), 333–364.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. Paradis, J. (2010). Bilingual children’s acquisition of english verb morphology: Effects of language exposure, structure complexity, and task type. Language Learning, 60(3), 651–680.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  86. Paradis, J., & Genesee, F. (1996). Syntactic acquisition in bilingual children: Autonomous or interdependent? Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 18, 1–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  87. Paradis, J., Crago, M., Genesee, F., & Rice, M. L. (2003). French–English bilingual children with SLI: How do they compare with their monolingual peers? Journal of Speech & Language Hearing Research, 46(2), 113–127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. Paradis, J., Crago, M., & Genesee, F. (2006). Domain-general versus domain-specific accounts of specific language impairment: Evidence from bilingual children’s acquisition of object pronouns. Language Acquisition, 13(1), 33–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. Paradis, J., Tremblay, A., & Crago, M. (2008). Bilingual children’s acquisition of English inflection: the role of language dominance and task type. In BUCLD 32 Proceedings. Retrieved from http://www.ualberta.ca/~jparadis/Paradisetal_BUCLD32Proceed.pdf
  90. Peristeri, E., Andreou, M., & Tsimpli, I. (2015). Clitic production in monolingual and bilingual children with Specific Language Impairment. In Proceedings of the Bi-SLI 2015. Bilingualism and Specific Language Impairment −2015. Tours (France). Retrieved from http://bisli.sciencesconf.org/58423
  91. Pons, F., Andreu Barrachina, L., Sanz-Torrent, M., Buil-Legaz, L., & Lewkowicz, D. J. (2013). Perception of audio-visual speech synchrony in Spanish-speaking children with and without specific language impairment. Journal of Child Language, 40(3), 687–700.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. Poulin-Dubois, D., Bialystok, E., Blaye, A., Polonia, A., & Yott, J. (2013). Lexical access and vocabulary development in very young bilinguals. The International Journal of Bilingualism: Cross-Disciplinary, Cross-Linguistic Studies of Language Behavior, 17(1), 57–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. Ramon-Casas, M., Swingley, D., Sebastián-Gallés, N., & Bosch-Galcerán, L. (2009). Vowel categorization during word recognition in bilingual toddlers. Cognitive Psychology, 59(1), 96–121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  94. Rapin, I., & Allen, D. A. (1983). Developmental language disorders. Nosologic considerations. In V. Kirk (Ed.), Neuropsychology of language, reading and spelling. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  95. Rapin, I., Dunn, M., & Allen, D. A. (2003). Developmental Language Disorders. In S. J. Segalowitz & I. Rapin (Eds.), Handbook of neuropsychology (2nd ed., Vol. 8, Part II, pp. 593–630). New York: Elsevier Science.Google Scholar
  96. Rezzonico, S., Chen, X., Cleave, P. L., Greenberg, J., Hipfner-Boucher, K., Johnson, C. J., et al. (2015). Oral narratives in monolingual and bilingual preschoolers with SLI. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 50(6), 830–841.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  97. Rice, M. L. (2016). Specific Language Impairment, nonverbal IQ, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, cochlear implants, bilingualism, and dialectal variants: Defining the boundaries, clarifying clinical conditions, and sorting out causes. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 59, 122–132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  98. Rice, M. L., Redmond, S. M., & Hoffman, L. (2006). Mean length of utterance in children with specific language impairment and in younger control children shows concurrent validity and stable and parallel growth trajectories. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 49(4), 793–808.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  99. Rice, M. L., Wexler, K., & Hershberger, S. (1998). Tense over time: The longitudinal course of tense acquisition in children with specific language impairment. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 41(6), 1412–1431.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  100. Roberts, P. M., Garcia, L. J., Desrochers, A., & Hernandez, D. (2002). English performance of proficient bilingual adults on the Boston Naming Test. Aphasiology, 16(4), 635–645.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  101. Rothweiler, M., Chilla, S., & Clahsen, H. (2011). Subject–verb agreement in specific language impairment: A study of monolingual and bilingual German-speaking children. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 15(01), 39–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  102. Sahlén, B., Reuterskiöld-Wagner, C., Nettelbladt, U., & Radeborg, K. (1999). Nonword repetition in children with language impairment: Pitfalls and possibilities. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 34, 337–352.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  103. Salameh, E.-K., Håkansson, G., & Nettelbladt, U. (2004). Developmental perspectives on bilingual Swedish-Arabic children with and without language impairment: A longitudinal study. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 39(1), 65–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  104. Sandgren, O., & Holmström, K. (2015). Executive functions in mono- and bilingual children with language impairment – Issues for speech-language pathology. Frontiers in Psychology, 6(July), 1–5.Google Scholar
  105. Sanz-Torrent, M., Aguilar-Mediavilla, E., Serrat Sellabona, E., & Serra-Raventós, M. (2001). Verb type production in Catalan and Spanish children with SLI. In M. Almgrem, A. Barreña, M. J. Ezeizabarrena, I. Idiazábal, & B. Macwhinney (Eds.), Research ono child language acquisition (Vol. II, pp. 909–922). Somerville: Cascadilla Press.Google Scholar
  106. Sanz-Torrent, M., Andreu Barrachina, L., Badia, I., & Sidera, F. (2011). Argument omissions in preschool Catalan and Spanish speaking children with SLI. Infancia y Aprendizaje, 34(1), 49–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  107. Sanz-Torrent, M., Badia, I., & Serra-Raventós, M. (2008a). Contributions from bilingual language impairment in Catalan and Spanish to the understanding of typical and pathological language acquisition. In C. Pérez Vidal, M. Juan-Garau, & A. Bel (Eds.), A portrait of the young in the new multilingual Spain (pp. 135–158). Clevedon: Multilingual matters.Google Scholar
  108. Sanz-Torrent, M., Serrat Sellabona, E., Andreu Barrachina, L., & Serra-Raventós, M. (2008b). Verb morphology in Catalan and Spanish in children with SLI: A developmental study. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 22(6), 459–474.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  109. Sebastián-Gallés, N. (2010). Bilingual language acquisition: Where does the difference lie? Human Development, 53(5), 245–255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  110. Sebastián-Gallés, N., Echeverría, S., & Bosch-Galcerán, L. (2005). The influence of initial exposure on lexical representation: Comparing early and simultaneous bilinguals. Journal of Memory and Language, 52(2), 240–255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  111. Serra-Raventós, M., Aguilar-Mediavilla, E., & Sanz-Torrent, M. (2002). Evolución del perfil productivo en el trastorno del lenguaje. Revista de Logopedia, Foniatría y Audiología, 22(2), 77–89.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  112. Spoelman, M., & Bol, G. W. (2012). The use of subject–verb agreement and verb argument structure in monolingual and bilingual children with specific language impairment. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 26(4), 357–379.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  113. Stothard, S. E., Snowling, M. J., Bishop, D. V. M., Chipchase, B. B., & Kaplan, C. A. (1998). Language-impaired preschoolers: A follow-up into adolescence. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 41(2), 407.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  114. Tay, M. W. J. (1989). Code switching and code mixing as a communicative strategy in multilingual discourse. World Englishes, 8(3), 407–417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  115. Valera-Pozo, M., Buil-Legaz, L., Rigo-Carratalà, E., Casero-Martínez, A., & Aguilar-Mediavilla, E. (2015). Habilidades sociales en preadolescentes con trastorno específico del lenguaje. Foniatría y Audiología: Revista de Logopedia.Google Scholar
  116. van Daal, J., Verhoeven, L., & van Balkom, H. (2009). Cognitive predictors of language development in children with specific language impairment (SLI). International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 44(5), 639–655.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  117. Vandewalle, E., Boets, B., Ghesquière, P., & Zink, I. (2010). Who is at risk for dyslexia? Phonological processing in five-to seven-year-old dutch-speaking children with SLI. Scientific Studies of Reading, 14(1), 58–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  118. Vihman, M. M., Thierry, G., Lum, J. A. G., Keren-Portnoy, T., & Martin, P. (2007). Onset of word form recognition in English, Welsh, and English–Welsh bilingual infants. Applied PsychoLinguistics, 28(03), 475–493.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  119. Vissers, C., Koolen, S., Hermans, D., Scheper, A., & Knoors, H. (2015). Executive functioning in children with specific language impairment. Frontiers in Psychology, 6(1574), 1–8.Google Scholar
  120. Westman, M., Korkman, M., Mickos, A., & Byring, R. (2008). Language profiles of monolingual and bilingual Finnish preschool children at risk for language impairment. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 43(6), 699–711.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  121. Windsor, J., & Kohnert, K. (2009). Processing speed, attention, and perception: Implications for child language disorders. In R. G. Schwartz (Ed.), The handbook of child language disorders (pp. 445–461). New York: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
  122. Zourou, F., Ecalle, J., Magnam, A., & Sanchez, M. (2010). The fragile nature of phonological awareness in children with specific language impairment: Evidence from literacy development. Child Language Teaching and Therapy, 26(3), 347–358.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eva Aguilar-Mediavilla
    • 1
    Email author
  • Lucia Buil-Legaz
    • 1
  • Raül López-Penadés
    • 1
  • Daniel Adrover-Roig
    • 1
  1. 1.Universitat de les Illes BalearsPalma de MallorcaSpain

Personalised recommendations