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Challenges Faced by Women Outdoor Leaders

  • Karen Warren
  • Shelly Risinger
  • TA Loeffler
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Gender and Education book series (GED)

Abstract

Working as an outdoor leader in a profession with a male-dominated history and practice presents unique challenges for women. Women leaders continue to face inequitable work environments, sexual harassment, questioning of their technical outdoor skills and competency, and gender-role stereotyping. In addition, lesbian and gender-nonconforming leaders encounter challenges rooted in heterosexism and transphobia in the outdoor leadership field. This chapter examines some of those challenges using both anecdotal stories and research to uncover lessons for making the outdoor leadership field more accessible and equitable to women outdoor leaders.

Keywords

Outdoor leadership Technical outdoor Skills Gender roles 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen Warren
    • 1
  • Shelly Risinger
    • 2
  • TA Loeffler
    • 3
  1. 1.Outdoor Programs, Recreation and Athletics, Hampshire CollegeAmherstUSA
  2. 2.GreenfieldUSA
  3. 3.Outdoor Recreation, School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, Memorial UniversitySt. John’sCanada

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