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Nourishing Terrains? Troubling Terrains? Women’s Outdoor Work in Aotearoa New Zealand

  • Martha Bell
  • Marg Cosgriff
  • Pip Lynch
  • Robyn Zink
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Gender and Education book series (GED)

Abstract

In this chapter, four women examine the influence of gender in their professional outdoor lives in Aotearoa New Zealand settings. Although their personal and professional experiences speak of the outdoors and outdoor learning as nourishing, the chapter advances the notion of “troubling terrains” by picking up on times each woman experienced gender-based exclusions. Working from a data set of individual letters addressing an issue requiring collective analysis, a framework of four terrains related to pedagogies, work, skills, and bodies emerges. “Troubling” the terrains reveals the potential of embodied outdoor experiences and women’s-only collectives as spaces for women to “do” gender differently. Extending the analysis to professional work contexts, the chapter untangles the persistent binding of women to gender and gender work, and posits the necessary contribution of men in outdoor groups and leadership to effecting social change in gender relations.

Keywords

Gender Outdoor leadership Feminism Work Women outdoor leaders New Zealand 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martha Bell
    • 1
  • Marg Cosgriff
    • 2
  • Pip Lynch
    • 3
  • Robyn Zink
    • 4
  1. 1.DunedinNew Zealand
  2. 2.Faculty of Health, Sport and Human PerformanceUniversity of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand
  3. 3.RichmondNew Zealand
  4. 4.EnviroschoolsDunedinNew Zealand

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