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Simulating the Formation Process of the Akatani Landslide Dam Induced by Rainfall in Kii Peninsula, Japan Open image in new window

  • Pham Van TienEmail author
  • Kyoji Sassa
  • Kaoru Takara
  • Khang Dang
  • Le Hong Luong
  • Nguyen Duc Ha
Conference paper

Abstract

The Akatani landslide triggered by heavy rainfall during Typhoon Talas on 4 September 2011 is one of 72 deep-seated catastrophic rock avalanches in Kii Peninsula, Japan. The landslide is about 900 m in length, 350 m in average width and 66.5 m of maximum depth of the sliding surface. A rapid movement of the landslide was downward the opposite valley and formed a natural reservoir that has a height of about 80 m and a volume of 10.2 million m3. This paper presents preliminary results of the simulation of the formation process of the Akatani landslide dam by using ring shear apparatus incorporated with a computer simulation model LS-Rapid. Ring shear tests on sandstone-rich materials and mudstone-rich materials taken near the sliding surface indicated that a rapid landslide was triggered due to excess pore water pressure generation under shear displacement control tests and pore water pressure control tests. The pore water pressure ratio (ru) due to rainfall was monitored from 0.33 to 0.37 in the ring shear tests on rainfall-induced landslides, approximately. Particularly, the formation process of the Akatani landslide dam and its rapid movement were well simulated by the computer model with physical soil parameters obtained from ring shear experiments. The actual ratio of pore water pressure triggering landslides was 0.35 in the computer simulation model. The results of the Akatani landslide simulation would be helpful to the understanding of failure process of deep-seated landslide induced by rainfall for future disaster mitigation and preparation in the area.

Keywords

Landslide Akatani Rainfall Mechanism Ring shear apparatus Computer simulation model 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The author thanks Mr. HAYASHI, vice-director of Kii Mountain District Sabo Office for providing DEM data. Especially, I am grateful to Professor Hiroshi FUKUOKA (Niigata University), Mr. Tatsuya SHIBASAKI and Mr. OGAWAUCHI (senior engineers at JCE) and Mr. Hendy Setiawan (Kyoto University) for their cooperation and kindly supports during the field investigation. This research was financially supported by the research grant from Leading Graduate School Program on Global Survivability Studies in Kyoto University (GSS Program). We deeply acknowledge all these important supports during this study.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pham Van Tien
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Kyoji Sassa
    • 3
  • Kaoru Takara
    • 1
  • Khang Dang
    • 3
    • 4
  • Le Hong Luong
    • 2
  • Nguyen Duc Ha
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of EngineeringDisaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Ministry of TransportInstitute of Transport Science and TechnologyHanoiVietnam
  3. 3.International Consortium on LandslidesKyotoJapan
  4. 4.VNU University of ScienceHanoiVietnam

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