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The History of Industry-Linked Research in English Waters: Lessons for the Future

  • Fraser SturtEmail author
  • Justin Dix
  • Michael J. Grant
Chapter
Part of the Coastal Research Library book series (COASTALRL, volume 20)

Abstract

This chapter charts the shifting relationship between industry and archaeology offshore. We argue that, just as on land, collaboration with developers has changed the scope and scale of our investigations, transforming our understanding of the submerged continental shelf. However, through considering the development of the subject we argue that there is a need to actively avoid complacency and to continually develop new approaches which better reflect our shifting interests and capabilities as archaeologists. In this light, the challenges of working offshore are shown to be one of its great strengths, in that it forces us to consider what we want to know, and how best to find it out.

Keywords

Submerged prehistory Developer funding Cultural resource management Industry 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Maritime ArchaeologyUniversity of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK
  2. 2.Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre SouthamptonUniversity of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK
  3. 3.Coastal and Offshore Archaeological Research Services (COARS), National Oceanography Centre SouthamptonUniversity of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK

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