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Non-Invasive and Non-Destructive Examination of Artistic Pigments, Paints, and Paintings by Means of X-Ray Methods

  • Koen JanssensEmail author
  • Geert Van der Snickt
  • Frederik Vanmeert
  • Stijn Legrand
  • Gert Nuyts
  • Matthias Alfeld
  • Letizia Monico
  • Willemien Anaf
  • Wout De Nolf
  • Marc Vermeulen
  • Jo Verbeeck
  • Karolien De Wael
Chapter
Part of the Topics in Current Chemistry Collections book series (TCCC)

Abstract

Recent studies are concisely reviewed, in which X-ray beams of (sub)micrometre to millimetre dimensions have been used for non-destructive analysis and characterization of pigments, minute paint samples, and/or entire paintings from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century painters. The overview presented encompasses the use of laboratory and synchrotron radiation-based instrumentation and deals with the use of several variants of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) as a method of elemental analysis and imaging, as well as with the combined use of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Microscopic XRF is a variant of the method that is well suited to visualize the elemental distribution of key elements, mostly metals, present in paint multi-layers, on the length scale from 1 to 100 lm inside micro-samples taken from paintings. In the context of the characterization of artists’ pigments subjected to natural degradation, the use of methods limited to elemental analysis or imaging usually is not sufficient to elucidate the chemical transformations that have taken place. However, at synchrotron facilities, combinations of μ-XRF with related methods such as μ-XAS and μ-XRD have proven themselves to be very suitable for such studies. Their use is often combined with microscopic Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and/or Raman microscopy since these methods deliver complementary information of high molecular specificity at more or less the same length scale as the X-ray microprobe techniques. Since microscopic investigation of a relatively limited number of minute paint samples, taken from a given work of art, may not yield representative information about the entire artefact, several methods for macroscopic, non-invasive imaging have recently been developed. Those based on XRF scanning and full-field hyperspectral imaging appear very promising; some recent published results are discussed.

Keywords

X-ray fluorescence X-ray diffraction X-ray absorption Synchrotron radiation Paintings Pigments 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koen Janssens
    • 1
    Email author
  • Geert Van der Snickt
    • 1
    • 2
  • Frederik Vanmeert
    • 1
  • Stijn Legrand
    • 1
  • Gert Nuyts
    • 1
  • Matthias Alfeld
    • 1
    • 3
  • Letizia Monico
    • 1
    • 4
  • Willemien Anaf
    • 1
    • 5
    • 7
  • Wout De Nolf
    • 1
    • 6
  • Marc Vermeulen
    • 1
    • 7
  • Jo Verbeeck
    • 8
  • Karolien De Wael
    • 1
  1. 1.AXES Research Group, Department of ChemistryUniversity of AntwerpAntwerpBelgium
  2. 2.Conservation/Restauration DepartmentUniversity of AntwerpAntwerpBelgium
  3. 3.Laboratoire d’Archéologie Moléculaire et StructuralePierre and Marie CurieParisFrance
  4. 4.Department of Chemistry, Biology and Biotechnologies, Centro SMAART and CNR-ISTMUniversity of PerugiaPerugiaItaly
  5. 5.Royal Museum of Fine Arts, BrusselsBrusselsBelgium
  6. 6.Experimental DivisionEuropean Synchrotron Radiation FacilityGrenobleFrance
  7. 7.Royal Institute for Cultural HeritageBrusselsBelgium
  8. 8.EMAT Research Group, Department of PhysicsUniversity of AntwerpAntwerpBelgium

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