Automatic Generation of Poetry Inspired by Twitter Trends

Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 631)

Abstract

This paper revisits PoeTryMe, a poetry generation platform, and presents its most recent instantiation for producing poetry inspired by trends in the Twitter social network. The presented system searches for tweets that mention a given topic, extracts the most frequent words in those tweets, and uses them as seeds for the generation of new poems. The set of seeds might still be expanded with semantically-relevant words. Generation is performed by the classic PoeTryMe system, based on a semantic network and a grammar, with a previously used generate&test strategy. Illustrative results are presented using different seed expansion settings. They show that the produced poems use semantically-coherent lines with words that, at the time of generation, were associated with the topic. Resulting poems are not really about the topic, but they are a way of expressing, poetically, what the system knows about the semantic domain set by the topic.

Keywords

Computational creativity Creative systems Poetry generation Social media 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CISUC, Department of Informatics EngineeringUniversity of CoimbraCoimbraPortugal

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