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Gender and the Politics of the Economic Crisis in Europe

  • Johanna Kantola
  • Emanuela Lombardo
Chapter
Part of the Gender and Politics book series (GAP)

Abstract

This chapter introduces the theme of the book, that is, the ‘political’ implications of the current economic crisis in Europe from a gender and intersectional perspective. This means introducing the three main issues developed in the chapters: (i) European Union (EU) austerity politics and related institutional and policy changes, (ii) the Europeanization of gender equality and policies in times of crisis and (iii) the gender and intersectional patterns of resistances and struggles against austerity politics.

Keywords

European Union Member State Civil Society Gender Equality European Central Bank 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johanna Kantola
    • 1
  • Emanuela Lombardo
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Philosophy, History, Culture and Art StudiesUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  2. 2.Department of Political Science and Administration 2, Faculty of Political Science and SociologyMadrid Complutense UniversityMadridSpain

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