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Migration under Control: Sovereignty, Freedom of Movement, and the Stability of Order

  • Svenja Gertheiss
Chapter
Part of the Global Issues book series (GLOISS)

Abstract

For decades, anyone entering national territory without valid documentation has faced criminalisation as an ‘illegal’. Although governments, international organisations, and societal majorities in receiving states support a type of order in which free movement is essentially restricted to the national sphere, resistance to such an order has also made itself felt. This comes in different forms and has different normative orientations, but all strands of it are united in striving to remove obstacles to human mobility and ease cross-border movement. However, none of these efforts has made much headway in turning the discursive tide on the regulation of international migration. Limited organisational capacity, difficulties in coalition-building, and ideological barriers have prevented success by oppositional and even more so by dissident actors.

Keywords

European Union International Migration Asylum Seeker Undocumented Migrant Border Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Supplementary material

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© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Peace Research Institute Frankfurt (PRIF)Frankfurt am MainGermany

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