Approaching International Dissidence: Concepts, Cases, and Causes

Chapter
Part of the Global Issues book series (GLOISS)

Abstract

The chapter identifies different types of resistance against international institutions and global order. In particular, it distinguishes moderate resistance—opposition—from radical resistance—dissidence. Both types are considered strategic constructions embedded in an international system of power and rule. By drawing on critical International Relations theory, contentious politics, and norms research, the chapter then develops a framework for analysing resistance and change in world politics. It particularly identifies potential causes of successful dissidence. Normative settings in specific policy fields can play as much a role as the characteristics and strategies of states and non-state actors involved in conflicts about global order. Several case studies are introduced that can further substantiate such assumptions.

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© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Peace Research Institute Frankfurt (PRIF)Frankfurt am MainGermany

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