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BioGro: A Plant Growth-Promoting Biofertilizer Validated by 15 Years’ Research from Laboratory Selection to Rice Farmer’s Fields of the Mekong Delta

  • Thanh Hien Nguyen
  • Thi Cong Phan
  • Abu T. M. A. Choudhury
  • Michael T. Rose
  • Rosalind J. Deaker
  • Ivan R. Kennedy
Chapter

Abstract

Since their original isolation from rice paddies near Hanoi, the set of microbial strains comprising the biofertilizer BioGro have been subjected to extensive and intensive experimentation in both laboratory and the field. Based on a hypothesis that such strains inoculated onto rice and other plants could significantly reduce the need for chemical fertilizers, this has been successfully tested using numerous procedures, documented in a series of peer-reviewed papers. The BioGro strains have been examined by a range of molecular and biochemical techniques, also providing means of quality control of inoculants. A positive response by rice plants to BioGro strains has been confirmed by proteomics. More than 20 randomized block design field experiments conducted in Vietnam or Australia have confirmed their effectiveness under a range of field conditions, reviewed here. Interactions with different rice cultivars have also been examined. While the response to inoculation is complex, the hypothesis of increased nutrient efficiency has been amply confirmed as consistent with observations. Finally, an extensive participatory research project over 3 years in the Mekong Delta showed reductions in fertilizer needs as high as 52 % as rice farmers learned to apply the technology. This result shows the importance of such adaptive practices for successful application of this biofertilizer technology in field condition.

Keywords

PGPR Pseudomonas Bacilli Soil yeast Rice proteomics 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful in the period 2000–2011 to the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID), the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC), the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation (RIRDC), the Australian Research Council (ARC) and World Bank Development Marketplace (Sustaining nitrogen efficient rice production DM#5227) for financial support, thus allowing the development of the concepts advanced in this review.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thanh Hien Nguyen
    • 1
  • Thi Cong Phan
    • 2
  • Abu T. M. A. Choudhury
    • 3
  • Michael T. Rose
    • 4
  • Rosalind J. Deaker
    • 3
  • Ivan R. Kennedy
    • 3
  1. 1.Biofertilizer Action Research CenterHanoiVietnam
  2. 2.Agriculture Green FutureHo Chi Minh CityVietnam
  3. 3.Faculty of Agriculture and EnvironmentUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia
  4. 4.NSW Department of Primary IndustriesWollongbar Primary Industries InstituteWollongbarAustralia

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