Reproducibility of Two Innate Immune System Models

  • Alva Presbitero
  • Valeria Krzhizhanovskaya
  • Emiliano Mancini
  • Ruud Brands
  • Peter Sloot
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 674)

Abstract

In this paper we present the first step towards the development of a mathematical model of human immune system for advanced individualized healthcare, where medication plan is fine-tuned for each patient to fit his conditions. We reproduce two representative models of the innate immune system. The first model by Rocha et al. describes the dynamics of the innate immune response by ordinary differential equations, focusing on LPS, neutrophils, resting macrophages, and activated macrophages. The second model by Pigozzo et al. describes the spatial dynamics of LPS, neutrophils, and pro-inflammatory cytokines by partial differential equations. We found that the results of the first model are fully reproducible. However, the second model is only partially reproducible. Several parameters had to be adjusted in order to reproduce the dynamics of the immune response: diffusion coefficients and the rates of LPS phagocytosis, cytokine production, neutrophils chemotaxis and apoptosis.

Keywords

Immune system model Innate immune system Scientific reproducibility ODE PDE Finite difference method 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alva Presbitero
    • 1
    • 2
  • Valeria Krzhizhanovskaya
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Emiliano Mancini
    • 2
  • Ruud Brands
    • 4
  • Peter Sloot
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.ITMO UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.University of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Saint Petersburg Polytechnic UniversitySaint PetersburgRussia
  4. 4.Nanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore

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