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eHealth 360° pp 492-496 | Cite as

Monitoring of Fetal Heart Rate via iPhone

  • Gábor Sipka
  • Tibor Szabó
  • Ráhel Zölei-Szénási
  • Melinda Vanya
  • Mária Jakó
  • Tamás Dániel Nagy
  • Márta FidrichEmail author
  • Vilmos Bilicki
  • János Borbás
  • Tamás Bitó
  • György Bártfai
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering book series (LNICST, volume 181)

Abstract

Recording of fetal heart rate can be reassuring for the mother about the fetus’ wellbeing. Our smart phone application can detect, record and evaluate fetal heart rate at any time. This method is based on sound wave thus free from the effects of ultrasound, and can be used all day without harming the fetus. It does not require medical assistance and easy to use at home. It reduces the queue at outpatient care units, helps pregnant women to relieve stress by listening to their unborn baby’s heartbeat. It improves mother-child relationship yet sends an alarming message if further examinations are needed to prevent the consequences of hypoxia.

Keywords

Fetal heart rate Mobile application Home monitoring Phonocardiography 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by “Telemedicine focused Researches on the Fields of Medicine, Mathematics and Informatics” TÁMOP- 4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0073 project. The research was financed by the European Union and the European Social Fund.

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Copyright information

© ICST Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gábor Sipka
    • 1
  • Tibor Szabó
    • 1
  • Ráhel Zölei-Szénási
    • 1
  • Melinda Vanya
    • 2
  • Mária Jakó
    • 2
  • Tamás Dániel Nagy
    • 1
  • Márta Fidrich
    • 1
    Email author
  • Vilmos Bilicki
    • 1
  • János Borbás
    • 2
  • Tamás Bitó
    • 2
  • György Bártfai
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of InformaticsUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  2. 2.Albert Szent-Györgyi Clinical CentreUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary

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