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Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Carbon Steel: Use of Induction and Laser as Preheating Techniques

  • Ana I. Álvarez
  • Victor Cid
  • Gloria Pena
  • Jose Sotelo
  • David Verdera

Abstract

The use of FSW in high melting point materials is still restricted due to limited tool life. Due to the high wear involved in the process, tool life is too short and the cost of replacing it is still too high. One of the ways that was explored to increase tool life is the use of preheating techniques to soften the material to be welded. Softening the material would cause a decrease in tool wear and therefore an increase in tool life. In this study, two preheating techniques were tested on the FSW of carbon steel: induction heating and laser heating. The data arising from the study show that the forces taking place during both hybrid processes were importantly reduced compared to those obtained in conventional FSW. Microstructure and mechanical testing of welds made in the three conditions were done showing the influence of each process on weld quality

Keywords

FSW of steels induction preheating laser preheating assisted FSW 

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Copyright information

© TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ana I. Álvarez
    • 1
  • Victor Cid
    • 1
  • Gloria Pena
    • 1
  • Jose Sotelo
    • 2
  • David Verdera
    • 2
  1. 1.ENCOMAT GroupSchool of Industrial Engineering - University of VigoVigoSpain
  2. 2.AIMEN Technology CentreJoining Technology PlantO PorriñoSpain

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