A NIME Reader pp 433-450 | Cite as

2013: The Web Browser as Synthesizer and Interface

  • Charles Roberts
  • Graham Wakefield
  • Matthew Wright
Chapter
Part of the Current Research in Systematic Musicology book series (CRSM, volume 3)

Abstract

Our research examines the use and potential of native web technologies for musical expression. We introduce two JavaScript libraries towards this end: Gibberish.js, a heavily optimized audio DSP library, and Interface.js, a GUI toolkit that works with mouse, touch and motion events. Together these libraries provide a complete system for defining musical instruments that can be used in both desktop and mobile web browsers. Interface.js also enables control of remote synthesis applications via a server application that translates the socket protocol used by web interfaces into both MIDI and OSC messages.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles Roberts
    • 1
  • Graham Wakefield
    • 2
  • Matthew Wright
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Interactive Games & MediaRochester Institute of TechnologyRochesterUSA
  2. 2.School of Arts, Media, Performance & DesignYork UniversityTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA)Stanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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