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A Computational Framework for the Design of Spinal Neuroprostheses

  • Marco Capogrosso
  • Erwan Bezard
  • Jocelyne Bloch
  • Gregoire Courtine
  • Silvestro Micera
Conference paper
Part of the Biosystems & Biorobotics book series (BIOSYSROB, volume 15)

Abstract

Severe Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) alters the communication between supra-spinal centers and the sensorimotor networks coordinating limb movements, which are usually located below the injury. Epidural electrical stimulation of lumbar segments has shown the ability to enable descending motor control of the lower limbs in rodents and humans with severe paralysis. Using computational models and in vivo experiments in rodents, we found that EES facilitates motor control through the recruitment of muscle spindle feedback circuits. Stimulation protocols targeting these circuits allowed the selective modulation of synergistic muscle groups, both in rodents and non-human primates. This framework supports the design of stimulation strategies for humans.

Keywords

Spinal Cord Injury Spinal Cord Stimulation Stimulation Protocol Lumbar Spinal Cord Selective Modulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marco Capogrosso
    • 1
  • Erwan Bezard
    • 2
  • Jocelyne Bloch
    • 3
  • Gregoire Courtine
    • 1
  • Silvestro Micera
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for NeuroprostheticsSwiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL)LausanneSwitzerland
  2. 2.University of BordeauxBordeauxFrance
  3. 3.Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV)LausanneSwitzerland

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