An Auditory Feedback System in Use with People Aged +50 Years: Compliance and Modifications in Gait Pattern

  • Theresa Fischer
  • Anita Kiselka
  • Ronald Dlapka
  • Jakob Doppler
  • Michael Iber
  • Christian Gradl
  • Anna-Maria Gorgas
  • Tarique Siragy
  • Brian Horsak
Conference paper
Part of the Biosystems & Biorobotics book series (BIOSYSROB, volume 15)

Abstract

Aging leads to gait impairments, which increases the risk for falls. In this study the impact of the auditory feedback system SONIGait on gait parameters in elderly persons was investigated. Twenty-one participants walked at self-selected speed with four variations of real-time auditory feedback of their plantar pressure. Repeated measures ANOVA was utilized to determine changes in time-distance parameters between walking without feedback and four feedback variations. After walking, they completed a questionnaire about their appraisal of the SONIGait system and the four different feedback modalities. There was a significant reduction in gait velocity (0.142 ± 0.04 m/s; p < 0.001) and prolongation of step time (0.02 ± 0.005 s; p < 0.001) during walking with SONIGait. No significant preference for any of the feedback variations was observed. Most participants evaluated the system SONIGait positively. Thus, real-time auditory feedback may be used in gait rehabilitation and may support an older person’s gait stability.

References

  1. 1.
    C. Todd, D. Skelton, What are the main risk factors for falls amongst older people and what are the most effective interventions to prevent these falls?,” 2004, Copenhagen, WHO Regional Office for Europe (Health Evidence Network report: http://www.euro.who.int/document/E82552.pdf. Accessed 5 April 2004
  2. 2.
    A. Muro-de-la-Herran, B. García-Zapirain, A. Méndez-Zorrilla, Gait analysis methods: an overview of wearable and non-wearable systems, highlighting clinical applications. Sensors 14(2), 3362–3394Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    H. Brock, G. Schmitz, J. Baumann, A.O. Effenberg, If motion sounds: movement sonification based on inertial sensor data. Proc. Eng. 34, 556–561 (2012)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    B. Horsak, M. Iber, K. Bauer, A. Kiselka, A.G. Gorgas, R. Dlapka, J. Doppler, A wireless instrumented insole device for real-time sonification of gait, in Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Auditory Display, 2015, Graz, Austria, pp. 94–101Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    R.A. Magill, D.I. Anderson, Motor Learning and Control: Concepts and Applications (McGraw-Hill, New York, 2014)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    H.B. Menz, S.R. Lord, R.C. Fitzpatrick, Age-related differences in walking stability. Age Ageing 32(2), 137–142 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theresa Fischer
    • 1
  • Anita Kiselka
    • 1
  • Ronald Dlapka
    • 2
  • Jakob Doppler
    • 2
  • Michael Iber
    • 2
  • Christian Gradl
    • 2
  • Anna-Maria Gorgas
    • 1
  • Tarique Siragy
    • 1
  • Brian Horsak
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiotherapySt. Poelten University of Applied SciencesSt. PoeltenAustria
  2. 2.Institute for Creative Media TechnologiesUniversity of Applied SciencesSt. PoeltenAustria

Personalised recommendations