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A Versatile Neuromuscular Exoskeleton Controller for Gait Assistance: A Preliminary Study on Spinal Cord Injury Patients

  • Amy R. WuEmail author
  • Florin Dzeladini
  • Tycho J. H. Brug
  • Federica Tamburella
  • Nevio L. Tagliamonte
  • Edwin van Asseldonk
  • Herman van der Kooij
  • Auke J. Ijspeert
Conference paper
Part of the Biosystems & Biorobotics book series (BIOSYSROB, volume 16)

Abstract

We investigated the capabilities of a reflex-based neuromuscular controller with a knee and hip gait trainer worn by a subject with a complete spinal cord injury. With controller assistance, this subject was able to reach a walking speed of 1.0 m/s. Measured joint torques agreed reasonably well with those of healthy subjects. The controller was also robust, recovering from manual swing foot perturbations. These preliminary results are promising for future implementation of neuromuscular controllers on wearable prototypes for real-world walking conditions.

Keywords

Knee Flexion Joint Angle Joint Torque Spinal Cord Injury Patient Body Weight Support 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is supported by EU research program FP7-ICT-2013-10 (SYMBITRON, grant #611626, coordinated by University of Twente).

   The authors thank Gijs van Oort of the University of Twente for help in conducting this study.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amy R. Wu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Florin Dzeladini
    • 1
  • Tycho J. H. Brug
    • 3
  • Federica Tamburella
    • 2
  • Nevio L. Tagliamonte
    • 2
  • Edwin van Asseldonk
    • 3
  • Herman van der Kooij
    • 3
    • 4
  • Auke J. Ijspeert
    • 1
  1. 1.BioRobotics Laboratory of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de LausanneLausanneSwitzerland
  2. 2.Laboratory of Robotic Neurorehabilitation in the Neurological and Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Department A of Fondazione Santa LuciaRomeItaly
  3. 3.Department of Biomechanical Engineering of the University of TwenteHollandThe Netherlands
  4. 4.The Netherlands and the Department of Biomechanical Engineering of the Delft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands

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