The Hybrid Brain Computer Music Interface - Integrating Brainwave Detection Methods for Extended Control in Musical Performance Systems

Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9617)

Abstract

In the pursuit of creative interfaces for music making brain-computer interfacing (BCI) control methods offer limited usability especially in terms of providing simultaneous yet independent input controls. This article outlines the development of the hybrid brain-computer music interface (BCMI) and presents the work undertaken towards the design, implementation, and combined BCI control methods employed. Two active (steady state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) and motor imagery (MI)) and one passive (affective response) control methods are integrated in a new BCMI system, which can be applied to a range of music-making activities. This paper also briefly outlines the design of bespoke, customisable and modular SSVEP stimuli and feedback units. As a demonstration of the hybrid-BCMI, the performance piece A Stark Mind illustrates how such a system is in for live performance. The piece uses the brainwave control methods to generate and control a visual score for an ensemble of musicians to perform.

Keywords

Neuro-technology Brain music Brainwave control Live performance Brain-computer music interfacing 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music ResearchPlymouth UniversityPlymouthUK

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