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Application Design and Engagement Strategy of a Game with a Purpose for Climate Change Awareness

  • Arno Scharl
  • Michael Föls
  • David Herring
  • Lara Piccolo
  • Miriam Fernandez
  • Harith Alani
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9934)

Abstract

The Climate Challenge is an online application in the tradition of games with a purpose that combines practical steps to reduce carbon footprint with predictive tasks to estimate future climate-related conditions. As part of the Collective Awareness Platform, the application aims to increase environmental literacy and motivate users to adopt more sustainable lifestyles. It has been deployed in conjunction with the Media Watch on Climate Change, a publicly available knowledge aggregator and visual analytics system for exploring environmental content from multiple online sources. This paper presents the motivation and goals of the Climate Challenge from an interdisciplinary perspective, outlines the application design including the types of tasks built into the application, discusses incentive mechanisms, and analyses the pursued user engagement strategies.

Keywords

Carbon Footprint Task Type Social Media Platform User Engagement Game Element 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgement

The Climate Challenge has been launched as part of the DecarboNet project, which receives funding by the EU 7th Framework Program for Research, Technology Development & Demonstration under Grant Agreement No 610829 (www.decarbonet.eu). It builds upon the crowdsourcing engine developed within the uComp project, which receives funding by EPSRC EP/K017896/1, FWF 1097-N23, and ANR-12-CHRI-0003-03, in the framework of CHIST-ERA ERA-NET (www.ucomp.eu).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arno Scharl
    • 1
  • Michael Föls
    • 1
  • David Herring
    • 2
  • Lara Piccolo
    • 3
  • Miriam Fernandez
    • 3
  • Harith Alani
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of New Media TechnologyMODUL University ViennaViennaAustria
  2. 2.National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Climate Program OfficeSilver SpringUSA
  3. 3.Knowledge Media InstituteThe Open UniversityMilton KeynesUK

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