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Synthesis of Compliant Mechanisms With Defined Kinematics

  • A. Hasse
  • M. Franz
  • K. Mauser
Conference paper
Part of the Mechanisms and Machine Science book series (Mechan. Machine Science, volume 45)

Abstract

A mechanism is designed to transform forces and/or displacements from an input to one or multiple outputs. This transformation is essentially ruled by the kinematics, i.e. the defined ratio between input and output displacements. Although the kinematics forms the basis for the design of conventional mechanisms, some common approaches for the topology and shape optimization of compliant mechanisms do not explicitly include the kinematics in their optimization formulation. The kinematics is more or less an outcome of the optimization process. A defined kinematics can only be realized by iteratively adjusting process-specific optimization parameters within the optimization formulation. This paper presents an optimization formulation that solves the aforementioned problem. It bases on one of the authors former publications on the design of compliant mechanisms with selective compliance. The formulation is derived by means of an intensive workup of the design problem of compliant mechanisms. The method is validated for a common design example: a force inverter.

Keywords

Compliant mechanisms Topology optimization Selective compliance Defined kinematics 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering DesignFriedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-NurembergErlangenGermany

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