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How to Become a Smart City: Learning from Amsterdam

Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

This exploratory study has been carried out to better understand the development process of strategies that allow large European cities to become smart. This aim is achieved through the analysis of the Amsterdam’s smart city strategy. By using case study research with a descriptive approach, the activities undertaken during the implementation of this successful initiative have been mapped and organized in a step-by-step roadmap. This made it possible to obtain a detailed description of the entire development process, useful knowledge to consider for other similar initiatives, and a conceptual framework for future comparative research. All these results will support the construction of a holistic and empirically valid theory able to explain how to build effective smart city strategies in this type of urban area.

Keywords

Smart city Strategy Roadmap Development process Amsterdam 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Politecnico di MilanoMilanItaly

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