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The Emergence of Powerful Anti-Gender Movements in Europe and the Crisis of Liberal Democracy

  • Eszter Kováts
Chapter
Part of the Gender and Politics book series (GAP)

Abstract

The paper briefly presents the genesis and discourse of anti-gender movements in Europe and the challenge they pose to liberal democracy. Then it critically analyses the interpretative frameworks elaborated so far for understanding these movements. The major conclusions of the paper are twofold: (1) Anti-gender movements confront us with the analytical limits of country case studies, which cannot be understood only on the basis of local national characteristics and political developments, but need to be studied in a broader framework. Nor are conceptualizations of these as backlash, homophobia, anti-feminism or a strategy of the Catholic Church sufficient. (2) Anti-gender fundamentalism points to societal crisis phenomena going beyond gender equality and LGBTQ rights. These movements and their success are symptoms and consequences of deeper socio-economic, political and cultural crises of liberal democracy.

Keywords

Gender Equality Liberal Democracy Political Association Gender Ideology Interpretative Framework 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BudapestHungary

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