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Central and Mixed Venous O2 Saturation: A Physiological Appraisal

  • Guillermo Gutierrez
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter reviews the physiological principles that underpin the clinical use of mixed venous oxygen saturation (SmvO2) and those of its purported surrogate, central venous O2 saturation (ScvO2). The development of techniques capable of measuring these variables is described, along with the clinical data in favor or against their use in various clinical conditions. The physiological conditions giving origin to ScvO2 are reviewed, as well as clinical data comparing SmvO2 to ScvO2. Recent developments regarding the use of ScvO2 to guide therapy in the resuscitation of septic patients are discussed.

Keywords

Cardiac output Central venous oxygen saturation Hypoxemia Mixed venous oxygen saturation Oxygen consumption Oxygen delivery Oxygen extraction Pulmonary shunt Sepsis Tissue oxygenation 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine DivisionThe George Washington University School of MedicineWashington, DCUSA

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