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3-D Conformal Therapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy/Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy

  • Raymond Chiu
  • Nicole McAllister
  • Fahad Momin
Chapter

Abstract

Central nervous system treatment planning has been evolving as new technology and research are being released. Traditional treatment methods, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), are slowly being replaced by newer techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). This chapter discusses important planning details to create 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT plans and provides plan evaluation guidelines to ensure high quality plans are produced. In addition, there are helpful tips for Varian Eclipse and Philips Pinnacle users to develop plans in a standardized and efficient manner. These planning details are used to develop several planning strategies which explain how to approach gliomas, hippocampal avoidance whole brain radiation therapy, craniospinal irradiation (CSI), craniopharyngioma, and pituitary tumors. By the end of this chapter, the reader should feel confident to treat patients safely and effectively so that the treatment plans satisfy a clinician’s criteria.

Keywords

Dosimetry 3D-CRT IMRT VMAT Eclipse Pinnacle Gliomas CSI Class solution Hippocampal sparing 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyKeck School of Medicine of University of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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