Using Video Game Patterns to Raise the Intrinsic Motivation to Conduct Accessibility Evaluations

Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 485)

Abstract

Even though many national and international guidelines exist to support the development of accessible web applications and to provide guidance, a high number of web applications are still inaccessible. For a large number of web authors, it is hard to imagine how persons with disabilities would interact with their web applications. Therefore, people with disabilities often end up not being considered part of a products’ target audience, and accessibility testing is experienced as an additional burden or skipped entirely. In this paper, we present an approach that augments an accessibility evaluation process with video game patterns to raise intrinsic motivation to conduct accessibility tests. This paper describes work in progress and illustrates how video game patterns can be pragmatically transferred and implemented in a non-game environment.

Keywords

Human computer interaction Gamification Accessibility User-centered accessibility evaluation Intrinsic motivation Video game patterns 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Responsive Media Experience Research Group (REMEX)Stuttgart Media UniversityStuttgartGermany

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