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Experimenting with Tactile Sense and Kinesthetic Sense Assisting System for Blind Education

  • Junji OnishiEmail author
  • Tadahiro Sakai
  • Msatsugu Sakajiri
  • Akihiro Ogata
  • Takahiro Miura
  • Takuya Handa
  • Nobuyuki Hiruma
  • Toshihiro Shimizu
  • Tsukasa Ono
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9759)

Abstract

In most of cases, communications based on multimedia form is inaccessible to the visually impaired. Thus, persons lacking eyesight are eager for a method that can provide them with access to progress in technology. We consider that the main important key for inclusive education is to real-timely provide materials which a teacher shows in a lesson. In this study, we present tactile sense and kinesthetic sense assisting system in order to provide figure or graphical information without an any assistant. This system gives us more effective teaching under inclusive education system.

Keywords

Special education Visual impaired Assistive technology Tactile Graphical presentation Information sharing Inclusive education 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported in both part by the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) 15K04540, 2015, (C) 15K01015, 2015, (B) 26285210, 2015, and Tsukuba University of Technology competitive research grants.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Junji Onishi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Tadahiro Sakai
    • 2
  • Msatsugu Sakajiri
    • 1
  • Akihiro Ogata
    • 1
  • Takahiro Miura
    • 3
  • Takuya Handa
    • 4
  • Nobuyuki Hiruma
    • 4
  • Toshihiro Shimizu
    • 4
  • Tsukasa Ono
    • 1
  1. 1.Tsukuba University of TechnologyIbarakiJapan
  2. 2.NHK Engineering SystemTokyoJapan
  3. 3.The University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  4. 4.NHK Science and Technology Research LaboratoriesTokyoJapan

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