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The Role of Small Robots in Designed Play Workshops in Centers of Adults with Cerebral Palsy

  • Isabel M. Gómez
  • Rubén Rodríguez
  • Juan Jesús Otero
  • Manuel Merino
  • Alberto J. Molina
  • Rafael Cabrera
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9758)

Abstract

An experience that took place in ASPACE (Association of People with Cerebral Palsy in Seville) showed that the intervention with games based on tangible devices like small robots is a good alternative in the case of people with cerebral palsy (CP). The aim is to develop skills in three facets: cognitive, motor and social. From three to six sessions with seven subjects allowed obtaining information on the evolution of them and their involvement in the activity.

Keywords

Small robots Cerebral palsy Games therapy Access to technology Social skills improvement 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the staff at ASPACE Seville and Ruben Rodríguez who designed CUBOT.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isabel M. Gómez
    • 1
  • Rubén Rodríguez
    • 1
  • Juan Jesús Otero
    • 1
  • Manuel Merino
    • 1
  • Alberto J. Molina
    • 1
  • Rafael Cabrera
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electronic TechnologyUniversidad de SevillaSevilleSpain

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