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An Information-Centric Framework for Mobile Collaboration Between Seniors and Caregivers that Balances Independence, Privacy, and Social Connectedness

  • Yomna Aly
  • Cosmin Munteanu
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 617)

Abstract

Participating in intellectually and socially complex activities provides cognitive benefits to older adults [9]. Socially engaged seniors tend to live longer [8], experience fewer depressive symptoms, self-report lower disability levels, and demonstrate higher levels of cognitive function [1] and lower incidence rates of dementia [3]. However, as complexity of knowledge, size of caregiver circle, and reliance on computers are all increasing, seniors need to maintain their sense of control and independence in their information-centered activities, as well as be able to access reliable trusted information sources. Therefore, our research goal is to develop a theoretical framework for intelligent assistive technologies that provide information-managing support and autonomy to older adults while alleviating the burden on caregivers. This framework will be tested and deployed as a collaborative mobile tool that facilitates information seeking and sharing, increases seniors’ confidence in the information presented, and satisfies their need of privacy and independence.

Keywords

Collaborative Independence Assistive technology Socio-technical environments Social connectedness Aging Caregiving 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Technologies for Aging Gracefully Lab, Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and TechnologyUniversity of Toronto MississaugaMississaugaCanada

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