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Engaging Anthropology in Sudan

  • Gunnar M. Sørbø
Chapter
Part of the Approaches to Social Inequality and Difference book series (ATSIAD)

Abstract

Engaged anthropology has many faces, from sharing and support during fieldwork to advocacy and activism to promote the rights of vulnerable populations. Many anthropologists also contribute strongly in a wide spectrum of contexts that transcend our discipline. For such reasons, James Peacock, in his comment to a paper on different dimensions of engaged anthropology by Setha M. Low and Sally Engle Merry (2010), suggests a further dimension: engaged anthropologists as distinguished from engaged anthropology (Peacock 2010, S216). The distinction is useful because it reminds us of both tension and productive interplay between anthropology and the engaged practitioner.

Keywords

Pacific anthropology Oceania European Union Policy-making 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gunnar M. Sørbø
    • 1
  1. 1.Chr. Michelsen InstituteBergenNorway

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