Congratulations, It’s a Boy! Bench-Marking Children’s Perceptions of the Robokind Zeno-R25

  • David Cameron
  • Samuel Fernando
  • Abigail Millings
  • Michael Szollosy
  • Emily Collins
  • Roger Moore
  • Amanda Sharkey
  • Tony Prescott
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9716)

Abstract

This paper explores three fundamental attributes of the Robokind Zeno-R25 (its status as person or machine, its ‘gender’, and intensity of its simulated facial expressions) and their impact on children’s perceptions of the robot, using a one-sample study design. Results from a sample of 37 children indicate that the robot is perceived as being a mix of person and machine, but also strongly as a male figure. Children could label emotions of the robot’s simulated facial-expressions but perceived intensities of these expressions varied. The findings demonstrate the importance of establishing fundamentals in user views towards social robots in supporting advanced arguments of social human-robot interaction.

Keywords

Human-robot interaction Humanoid Psychology 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-ICT-2013-10) under grant agreement no. 611971.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Cameron
    • 1
  • Samuel Fernando
    • 1
  • Abigail Millings
    • 1
  • Michael Szollosy
    • 1
  • Emily Collins
    • 1
  • Roger Moore
    • 1
  • Amanda Sharkey
    • 1
  • Tony Prescott
    • 1
  1. 1.Sheffield RoboticsUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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