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Development of an Intelligent Robotic Rein for Haptic Control and Interaction with Mobile Machines

  • Musstafa Elyounnss
  • Alan Holloway
  • Jacques Penders
  • Lyuba Alboul
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9716)

Abstract

The rescue services face numerous challenges when entering and exploring dangerous environments in low or no visibility conditions and often without meaningful auditory and visual feedback. In such situations, rescue-personnel may have to rely solely on their own immediate haptic feedback in order to make their way in and out of a burning building by running their hands along the wall as a means of navigation. Consequently, the development of technology and machinery (robot) to support exploration and aid navigation would provide a significant benefit to the search and rescue operation; enhancing the capabilities of the fire and rescue personal and increasing their ability to exit safely [1]. A brief review and analysis of the previous published literature on exploring environments in low or no visibility conditions where haptic feedback has been utilized is provided and the design of a new intelligent haptic rein is proposed.

Keywords

Haptic feedback Haptic rein Navigation 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by Libyan Embassy.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Musstafa Elyounnss
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alan Holloway
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jacques Penders
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lyuba Alboul
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Materials and Engineering Research InstituteSheffield Hallam UniversitySheffieldUK
  2. 2.Sheffield RoboticsSheffieldUK

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